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Small pimple like in back of throat and uvula, white patches like on bottom side of tongue?
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An_247715 posted:
Hi, i just recently got sick this past Saturday (the 8th) and from there I've had headaches, aches all over my body soreness on my tongue and back of my throat, and a hard time swallowing/eating and drinking water. Today, (Monday, the 10th) I just recently discover that I have these small reddish white pimple like substances at the top of my mouth, one at my throat and this white patch like on the bottom of my tongue. It hurts every time I try to drink water or eat food, and every time I cough, my head would hurt a lot. Can I have oral cancer? (I'm only 17 and my husband and I have been doing those sexual things (this does not involve sexual intercourse) recently and we're scared that it might be oral cancer.) Can someone help me and give some advice about what I should do about this?

Here's some picture:




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Rod Moser, PA, PhD responded:
I definitive diagnosis cannot be made by photographs alone.....in medicine, it takes a hands-on examination. With that said, it appears that you may have a good case of APHTHOUS STOMATITIS, otherwise known as canker sores. You can look this up on-line. Another possibility is herpes stomatitis, but before you freak out, this would need to be confirmed by exam and/or a herpes culture. Herpes typically forms groups of these little blisters, whereas aphthous ulcers are more isolated. Since you seem to have quite a few, this would be a diagnostic consideration.

Oral cancer would be last on my list.....and highly unlikely, but I don't know your medical history, age, or smoking history.
 
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YajMee14 replied to Rod Moser, PA, PhD's response:
I am a healthy teenage girl, I don't tend to get sick that often; only when the season changes or if I catch something without knowing.(So that would be like once or twice a year that I do get sick or not at all, it varies for me.) I don't smoke since my parents never approve it and I hate the smell of it (it gives me headaches.) And I'm 17 going to be 18 in 2 months.
 
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Rod Moser, PA, PhD replied to YajMee14's response:
Again....you will need to get those mouth lesions carefully examined, but the chance of this being cancer is extremely remote.
 
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YajMee14 replied to Rod Moser, PA, PhD's response:
Thanks for the help. Me and my husband really appreciate it. And another thing I've just recently found out it that some of those sores are appearing on my tongue and the side of my right cheek, at the end of my tongue going down my throat, and at my molars on the right. Is it normal for the sores to appear that quickly in one day?

Thanks,
-Pa Vang
 
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Rod Moser, PA, PhD replied to YajMee14's response:
There is nothing really considered "normal" when it comes to afflictions on the human body. When oral sores, like yours, progress, that concerns me. One of the considerations like I mentioned is herpes stomatitis...a viral infection. Unlike most viruses, there is a specific medication for this one if your medical provider feels you may have this problem...and the sooner you start the antiviral medication, the better it is.
 
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YajMee14 replied to Rod Moser, PA, PhD's response:
I really want to go in and get a check up but every time I try to tell my mom, she just said not to worry about it since it's nothing big. And today it got a little worse and a little more painful. What should I do?
 
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Rod Moser, PA, PhD replied to YajMee14's response:
You are young, but married now....so you will need to make adult decisions, especially when it comes to your health. My original recommendation stands....see a medical provider so you can be properly examined, diagnosed, and treated.
 
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YajMee14 replied to Rod Moser, PA, PhD's response:
Since I'm still living with my mother, she said we can't do any check up since our medical cards have not arrived yet. But can I still go in and get it check without the card?
 
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Rod Moser, PA, PhD replied to YajMee14's response:
I don't know anything about your medical card....not even where you live.
 
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MedicalWife replied to Rod Moser, PA, PhD's response:
Although extremely rare, this young lady might want to see a dentist or dermatologist to rule out PEMPHIGUS VULGARIS. Most doctors overlook it as an option because it's so rare but the blisters all over the inside of the mouth, throat, and tongue along with the soreness and inability to swallow really do make me wonder. Also, it can onset very rapidly with no previous warning or symptoms. Left untreated, it can be fatal. Agressively treated, it is quite managable. Leave no stone unturned!