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    Ear Tubes for a 22 month old
    avatar
    An_248163 posted:
    Hello,

    We have recently been told that our 22 month old daughter is a candidate for ear tubes after 6 ear infections in a year's time. She did really good this summer (only 1 ear infection over 4 months) but had a rough winter last year and has already had 2 in September so we are anticipating a rough winter this year as well.

    My question is, is it worth it to get tubes this late? Our ENT also mentioned some children grow out of ear infections after 2. I am just anxious about doing a surgery that she might not really need in a few months. Thanks in advance!
    Reply
     
    avatar
    Rod Moser, PA, PhD responded:
    Not two.....children tend to get less ear infections after age SIX. From six months to two years is the highest incidence, but from age two to six is the next-highest incidence.

    The purpose of inserting tubes is not to prevent middle ear infections, but rather the preservation of her hearing. Stagnant fluid in the middle ear over six months can lead to permanent hearing loss. Ear infections are relatively easy to treat. As a matter of fact, most go away without antibiotics, but it is the FLUID that is the real issue.

    If she is in day-care, this winter cold and flu season may be a real challenge for her and your family.


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