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how long do you give an ear issue to resolve itself?
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An_247728 posted:
sory this is long! In august, i had a bad cold/respiratory thing that was also making my ears plugged and saw my Primary doc twice for the same thing they said there was fluid and the - first time the PA there gave me a z pac and amoxicillan and all symptoms went away brieflybut not completely. Retunred about 3 weeks later and they gave me another antibiotic and steriods. said if no relief i have to see an ENT. fast forward to october. yet another sinus/ respiratory thing ( I am not convinced i ever was 100% "better" ). I figured out how to pop my ears and then took myself to the ENT. he told me to "keep popping my ears, gave me an rx for flonase and told me that my e tube was swollen and needed to open up. said it might take 3 months to fix. said no more antibiotics b/c no infection. fast forward to late october. ear pain AND fullness, can't pop ears. this time ENT said i have an ear infection. gave me amoxicillan and said continue popping and with flonase. said if no improvement in 3 months we talk tubes. My question is: I am 49 12 years old . until august i never had an ear infection in my life or any ear issues. I have been under a lot of stress and i think all this might be related to a sinus thing that isn't going away (I feel pressure all the time alongside my nose on the right saide and it hurts when i swallow - sore near bottom of my earlobe on neck) ) but the ENT keeps focusing on the ears. I am finished the amoxixillan but my ear is hurting a bit. Is that a week antibiotic? will this thing eventually go resolve itself on its own? shoudl i get a second opinion?
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Rod Moser, PA, PhD responded:
You may be correct with focusing more on the sinuses. When the sinuses are draining, this drainage can cause significant inflammation in the Eustachian Tubes, and of course, when the e-tubes are compromised, you will have fullness and the need to pop your ears.

You have been treated appropriately, perhaps even more aggressively than most. The problem is that Eustachian tube problems are difficult to treat. Whether you end up with tubes or not, I really can't say. As far as a second opinion is concerned, that is really your call, but ENTs seem to think alike, so the second ENT may recommend tubes as well.

You are correct in being reluctant to go this route, but sometimes the choice become evident the longer you remain symptomatic.


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