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Ears ringing but normal hearing
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barflyz posted:
Hi, I have had cold like symptoms for 3 weeks and 3 days. Tons of sinus pressure, clogged ears etc... I was exposed to loud music about 2 weeks ago and now have had ringing in ears like if I went to a loud concert. I went to ENT today and said I had nasal polyps and allergies and prescribed prednisone and flonase. He said this is unrelated to the ears but I have read thay can relate to ringing in ears. I had a hearing test at their office today and he said I passed with flying colors but was not optimistic that ringing would stop... Everything I have read gives me better hope that what this Dr. stated but now I am totally confused. I do go to at least one loud concert a week so starting tonight I will ear earplugs... Can the prednisone help with the ringing? thanks!
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Rod Moser, PA, PhD responded:
Maybe....prednisone is often used early in the case of acoustic injury (loud noise), but starting it two weeks after is iffy. My guess would be that it will not help, but over time, your ringing should improve.....as long as you don't damage it again, over and over, by going to the club. Wear those earplugs or find a quieter bar.
 
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barflyz replied to Rod Moser, PA, PhD's response:
thanks, I actually sang with a band last night and used ear plugs all night long but it still escalated the ringing a little. I started the pred today actually and flonase. Any vitamins worth trying? I currently take a multi and biotin daily with a baby aspirin.

thanks so much!!
 
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Rod Moser, PA, PhD replied to barflyz's response:
Vitamins have not been proven to alter the course of tinnitus, reduce symptoms, or cure any of the possible causes. They are okay to take, but don't expect vitamins or supplements to be the panacea.

It appears that your ears are quite noise-sensitive, not an uncommon occurence when you have tinnitus (I have it, too), so as much noise as you can avoid, the better. If you continue exposing your ears to more noise, your symptoms be last longer or even become permanent. The choice is yours, but the ears and your hearing is such a precious gift, that it would be shame to continue to push the envelope. Right now, your hearing is good, according to the ENT. Hopefully, it will remain that way.

The course of tinnitus is unpredictable, so there is really no way to predict the future.
 
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barflyz replied to Rod Moser, PA, PhD's response:
The ENT never really checked my ears by looking in them but focused on my allergy symptoms. I still have to yawn to un-pop my ears and was wondering if I should try an ear wax cleaning system? I have never in my life done this....

Also, my daughter had a mild mitochondrial disorder causing developmental delay and she is on a cocktail on COQ10 that is actually working and reversing and stopping certain symptoms/markers. So of course some research I read said Coq10 may help.... I was going to try 50mg a day since it has no side effects unless I go above 200 mg per day.. any thoughts? thanks so much!!!!!
 
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Rod Moser, PA, PhD replied to barflyz's response:
The ENT never looked in her ears???? I find that troubling.

It is not very likely that you have a wax impaction, but if the ENT never looked, how would we know? Someone needst to look inside before wasting your time on cleaning your ear canal. It is more likely that your problem is with your Eustachian tubes on the other side of the eardrum....in the middle ear space.

I am not a big fan of anyone self-treating, especially with this cocktail of a substance that I know nothing about. I cannot endorse it.
 
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barflyz replied to Rod Moser, PA, PhD's response:
He looked in them very quickly but focused more on my sinuses. I am on the 5th day of pred and I have noticed a slight improvement but it still feels like my ears are clogged so maybe I just need to be patient? I keep yawning to open them up...
I was not happy with this ENT... He seemed to busy to spend anytime with me. thanks
 
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Rod Moser, PA, PhD replied to barflyz's response:
Wait out the duration of the prednisone prescription and then call the ENT if you are not better....No since in making another appointment if he is not going to spend time and examine you properly.

Eustachian tube problems can be tricky to fix and it take TIME....How long? Unpredictable.
 
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barflyz replied to Rod Moser, PA, PhD's response:
thank you! I do seem a little better. There is a part of me that know thinks the ringing is a figment of my imagination because I am honing on it so much. I really I have to try very hard in quiet room with my ears plugged to notice anything resembling a ring. Or it could be he meds are helping. I am also a singer that gets about 3 hours a week exposure to loud music. Our rehearsal space is the main culprit because it is so small and loud. My ENT said not to give it up but wear ear plugs also so I have started this practice going forward. thanks again!
 
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Rod Moser, PA, PhD replied to barflyz's response:
Keep me posted on your progress, and I am optimistic that you will progressively improve.
 
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barflyz replied to Rod Moser, PA, PhD's response:
What I have noticed is if I listen to a song on radio at low volume, if the song has a high pitched sound like from a keyboard. It will cause my right ear to hurt and throb a little. I guess I have a sensitivity to a high frequency but again my hearing test was normal. Is thisn something I can treat? Thx
 
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Rod Moser, PA, PhD replied to barflyz's response:
Not something you can treat at home, certainly, and perhaps, not even something your ENT can easily treat. Hearing aberrations are extremely complex. They are difficult to evaluate and find a specific cause, and even more difficult to treat.
 
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barflyz replied to Rod Moser, PA, PhD's response:
So I started wearing ear plugs. Hopefully they are decent enough. I tried using them singing Wed and it is a big adjustment but I think I can make it work. My right ear still has a very very low ring which can only be heard when it is dead quiet. I also think I am making it worse by honing in on it. I am worried though that the ear plugs may not be sufficient enough...

thanks again!
 
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Rod Moser, PA, PhD replied to barflyz's response:
I once did an Internet seach so I could find the various types of earplugs....I think you will be amazed, as I was when I saw the variety out there. You could try a different type if you are not sure about the ones you have now.

Singing with earplugs is going to be a challenge, but if you can make it work...great.
 
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barflyz replied to Rod Moser, PA, PhD's response:
Hi, so I had a set-back. I sang at a show Sat night and used the Hearos High Fidelity ear plugs which do not muffle the sound but reduce the overall volume (I think they only reduce by 12 decibels).

I loved them and they worked great. Unfortunately, they did not give me as much protection as needed because my ears are buzzing pretty bad like you get after a loud concert. It has been around 36 hrs since the last note was played and they are buzzing. My last pred was yesterday so I started Ginko and Lipofavanoids. I realize they may not do anything but it is worth a shot. Should I call the ENT?

Also, I guess I have to find some better plugs.... I prob need at least 20 db reduction....

thanks again!!


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