Skip to content
My WebMD Sign In, Sign Up
Includes Expert Content
Sudden Partial Hearing Loss
avatar
Dadavi18 posted:
Short story: One day I felt like I had something clogging my left ear. It was ringing as well, but not just lightly like tinnitus, but loud ringing. It's not congestion, nor is anything wrong with my ear drum, ear canal, and no clogs in the Eustachian tube or ear canal. The ENT said it was Sudden Sensory Neural Hearing loss, but I've read articles on this,+ and it's not common for my age (25). I'm currently taking valacyclovir and Prednisone.

Long Story: I'm 6' 1" at 190lb. No allergys. No medical problems in my past. Heart rate and blood pressure always stable and normal. I occasionally took oxyelite pro and I eat very healthy with moderate exercise. I used to smoke for a year and I quit about a week before the sudden hearing loss. I was on the patch for 5 days (14mg) and I went off the patch 2 days before the hearing loss. I coach diving for high school and the pool hall can get pretty loud. The day of the occurrence we had a diving/swimming meet that got exceptionally loud, but nothing I wouldn't think twice of for excessive sound exposure. I've shot magnums with no earplug and that was way louder than this pool hall. The noise only lasted for a couple minutes. I felt like I had ear wax built up in my ear so I used my finger and qtips to try and clear out what I thought was a clogged ear. The next day it felt like congestion and ringing was present. I took Mucinex D because the health clinic at work said it was probably congestion. I got in the pool with my divers and my hearing came back for a few minutes, but then left. After a couple of days I went to see an ENT and took a hearing test (if you want the results I have a picture of it). He said it looks like a strong case for Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss. I had 3 options. 2 Oral medications and a direct injection through my eardrum of steroids. I chose the oral and declined the invasive procedure. Dec 9th is when this started, so it's been the same for about 10 days. My Uncle is an ENT and said it should heal in 1 - 6 months but I'm not sure. The partial hearing loss doesn't bother me as much as the excessive ringing.

So I'd really like to know what I might have, what my chances are of getting my hearing back, and how I got this to avoid it in the future. If you need any information please let me know, and I'll provide you with what ever you may need.

Thanks!
Reply
 
avatar
Rod Moser, PA, PhD responded:
I think your ENT and your ENT uncles would like to answer that question, too....

Although uncommon, adults can experience a sudden hearing loss in one ear without warning. This can be absolutely frightening and devastating. The exact cause of this puzzling event may be very difficult to determine and may include such things as vascular accidents (strokes), severe viral or bacterial infections, autoimmune disease (rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, etc.), or tumors. Many times, even after a thorough diagnostic work-up, the exact cause remains elusive.

I think this is where you are right now. You did the right thing by seeing an ENT immediately and did receive appropriate treatment. Whether this will help or not, or if your hearing will return to normal, is really anyone's guess at this point. Only time will reveal the answer.

My heart goes out to you, but you appear to be under good care. All you can do is hope for the best.
 
avatar
JoeyLast responded:
I've had a similar thing happening to me on-and-off for maybe the past 10 years. I'm a 35 yr old male in good physical shape, though I do have type 1 diabetes (which is kept under control). No smoking or other medications.

It's typically a seasonal thing, often happening in the fall (just started with me again about a week ago). Typically it'll last for a few weeks, but a combination of ear drops, those ear candle things, decongestants, and various other ear treatments gotten off the shelf will fix it.

I've never seen a specialist (or PCP) about it, mainly because I often don't have health insurance (or the money for a copay when I do have insurance). But it's always resolved itself eventually. I've always just thought it was a seasonal congestion type thing.

And I know that as a Type I diabetic there's a chance of some nerve damage that could contribute to partial hearing loss, but I'm under decent control, and it's never stuck around more than a month, so nerve damage seems unlikely.


Helpful Tips

Your Home Black BagExpert
Doctors used to carry black bags containing all the medical tools they would need for a home visit. Of course, that rarely happens anymore. ... More
Was this Helpful?
31 of 53 found this helpful

Expert Blog

Focus on Flu

Find answers to your questions about seasonal flu issues and answers to your concerns about the flu season and H1N1...Read More

Related News

There was an error with this newsfeed

Report Problems With Your Medications to the FDA

FDAYou are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.