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    Worried About My Throat
    avatar
    Lando13 posted:
    Hi, I'm 22 years old and about 3 months ago I woke up with a slight sore throat. I was especially worried because It was the morning after I had kissed a girl and it was our first time. When I checked my throat in the mirror I noticed that my throat was very veiny and there appeared to be red/orange spots around the back of my throat as well. Within a few days I soon developed a terrible stomach ache and a loss of appetite. The soreness in my throat went away, but the red/orange spots and veins appeared to have remained the same if not gotten worse. So I made an appointment to see a doctor. The doctor prescribed me antibiotics and swabbed my throat for a culture test. After taking the antibiotics as prescribed my stomach pains went away and I went back to see the doctor about my throat. He told me that the culture test came back negative and that my throat looked normal. I was really surprised when he said my throat looked normal because I knew that it didn't. When I asked him about the spots he didn't really know what to say. I left the doctor's that day with none of my questions answered and that was about a month and a half ago. I'm not very confident at all with what my doctor told me and I hope I can get some other opinions. I'm posting here in hope that someone will be able to give me an idea of why my throat appears the way that it does. My throat hasn't been sore at all it just looks very bad. Perhaps I'm just worried about nothing. It is possible that my throat has always been like this and I just didn't notice it until I inspected it the day I had that slight throat, I can't be sure. I have attached some pictures. One is of the first day that I noticed I had the sore throat. The 2nd is of how my throat looks today. Thank you for your time and I appreciate any advice you can give me.
    October 27(First day): http://i269.photobucket.com/albums/jj47/Butcherkiller13/Throat/October27_zps23abf60f.jpg

    January 4(Today): http://i269.photobucket.com/albums/jj47/Butcherkiller13/Throat/January4_zps04bc6818.jpg
    Reply
     
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    bxdude0102 responded:
    Do you have any updates on the state of your throat? My throat looks very very similar to yours: veiny, orange splotches, etc. I similarly had a sexual encounter before noticing all of this in my throat as well. I haven't had any soreness in my throat, but a general feeling of congestion in my head/throat and of course the weird look to the throat. I have been thinking it might be an STD like gonorrhea or something, but now I'm thinking it's not the case since you've had this for over 2 months at the time of posting it and I would assume an STD would have progressed to something more unpleasant after that much time. Regardless, I'm going to get a full STD checkup this week and probably go to the Dr. to have him look at my throat.
     
    avatar
    Rod Moser, PA, PhD responded:
    I suspect your throat has always looked like this.....what you are seeing is called "cobblestoning" - basically the bumps are just ectopic lymph tissue (normal). It has nothing to do with kissing, nor are those findings consistent with any STD. Your doctor and I see thousands of the throats....you have see one (yours)...so what you assume is "not normal" really has no basis from comparisons

    Relax. I do think you are concerned about nothing.
     
    avatar
    Rod Moser, PA, PhD replied to bxdude0102's response:
    Gonorrhea of the throat does not look like this, but if you did have oral (unprotected) sex and area concerned, I would suggest that you see your doctor (and be honest with him about your concerns).
     
    avatar
    bxdude0102 replied to Rod Moser, PA, PhD's response:
    Thank you for the response. Yes, I think a lot of us notice something about our bodies that we've never noticed before, and then we start to assume to the worst.
     
    avatar
    Rod Moser, PA, PhD replied to bxdude0102's response:
    At least you look....some people are too oblivious.
     
    avatar
    Lando13 replied to bxdude0102's response:
    My throat still looks about the same since the first day I noticed it. I haven't had any sore throats or discomfort and have for the most part forgot about it. I'm pretty sure that it is just normal and has always looked like this. It's very comforting to know Dr. Rod has seen thousands of throats that look like this and are in the normal category.
     
    avatar
    Rod Moser, PA, PhD replied to Lando13's response:
    No, I said I saw thousands of throats, but not all of them look like yours. Cobblestoning is still considered to be normal, though.


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