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Electronictoys posted:
My partner has had countless issues with ear infections. I think this is her 10th infection over the last year. There is a drainage if I could call that coming out her ear that is black and brownish accompanied by bright red blood. Her mood normally cheery has been very snappy. This evening she told me the pain got so bad that she just threw up. I think she doesn't have a cold over a flu. Is it possible that pain in the ears could get so bad a person would throw up? She is also saying her neck is sore. SHe is unable to eat solids because her jaw is swollen and it is difficult for her to bite, So the vomiting worries me.

You might remember me from a few months back. If not that is quite all right. My partner is very leery to go to the doctor and is quite fed up especially after trekking 50 miles after Hurricane Sandy only to get lectured by one of her surgeons who had removed her Paraganglioma that it was only a infection that disrupted the granulated tissue she has in her ear post surgery. It took a lot to grt her to the ENT only for her to leave disappointrd and angry(bribe ring, promising her favorite cupcake, everything short of kidnapping). My partner is two years post op, should this granulated tissue that I had been hearing about from these doctors for two years gone away? Could there be something that the doctors are missing about this granulated tissue. Despite having ear infections most of her adult life, the ones post surgery have been extremely painful and quite nasty. Oh BTW, she abruptly left another ENTs office because he said she had bad hygiene and that was the cause of her ear problems. I was offended too because she has meticulous hygiene and has followed doctors instructions on cleaning her ears and using her ear drops. At nearly 50 bucks a pop for two years, it seems that this Ciprodex and Neomycin has been a waste of money.
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Rod Moser, PA, PhD responded:
Actually, I do remember you and your partner....

Yes, ear pain can cause dizziness, nausea, and vomiting. Combined with her on-going frustration over her unsolved ear problems and rejection of the medical establishment, we have a real dilemma.

She cannot be adequately diagnosed or treated unless she finds an ENT that she trusts and will follow through. Not all problems, especially the long-standing issues she has had, can be solved in one visit. Sometime, patient and medical provider personalities do clash, but if the medical professional is competent, one might excuse the fact that they may be jerks. Over the year, I have found that some of the best surgeons have terrible personalities....but they do great work.

Next to her ear issues, the most obvious barrier is her stubborness. It is easy to just give up, blame others, and let Nature take it's toll, but this is usually not the way to go. Medical science is not perfect, and yes, there are people that shouldn't be dealing with humans out there, but it is better than just ignoring some potentially-serious symptoms.

You can only do so much in the way of bribes. She is going to really have to take the initiative to seek care again. Past experiences do not predict future experiences. Maybe she will find an ENT that she likes, but she is not going to find one sitting at home ignoring her medical issues.
 
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Electronictoys replied to Rod Moser, PA, PhD's response:
Thanks. What scares me is this granulated tissue and the dismissive nature of some docs like you said. One was like come back in a year and didn't offer any other suggestion for any sooner follow up. I agree that you cant sit at home wallowing, but I do know it could be exhaustion too from going to over 25 specialists from eye doctors, Neurologist, ENTs, and dentists to find her some pain relief and tumor help. I am reaching out to her mother because I think that is the only person she will listen to and can talk sense into her like only a mother could.
 
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Rod Moser, PA, PhD replied to Electronictoys's response:
Her symptoms concern me as well.....but finding a compassionate and thorough ENT that she likes and respects may be her biggest challenge outside of her health. Skip the neigborhood ENT and go directly to a large, university-based medical center ENT department for a high-level evaluation. Hopefully, she has been collecting all of her medical records, scans, etc. into a large file. If not, this would be job to start now.

Mothers (and parnters) can only do so much. When you have a stubborn and frustrated person in our lives, it wears us out, too. She will need to step up to the plate and take responsibility for her own care.
 
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Electronictoys replied to Rod Moser, PA, PhD's response:
We got my partner to a new ENT. He prescribed Ciprodex which is a drug that she has been constantly prescribed over the last 3 years with no avail. New ENT really didn't address the swollen lymph nodes behind her ear that are the size of a walnut(it really looks chipmunkish) I really think over 20 plus years of antibiotics prescribed about 4 to 6 times a year, she may have developed a tolerance to them if that make sense. Onto my question about the granulated tissue-- is it okay or even right to ask the doctor for a culture or more test to be taken from the tissue maybe to find out why the granulated tissue, the swollen lymph nodes, fever, infection, drainage, and blood continue to reoccur.
 
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Rod Moser, PA, PhD replied to Electronictoys's response:
You can certainly ask to see if the ENT feels this would be helpful. Reactive lymph nodes (assuming this is the nature of the lumbs behind the ears) can calcify and last a long, long time. A CT scan of the mastoid would have been appropriate, too.
 
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Electronictoys replied to Rod Moser, PA, PhD's response:
Thanks again for your help. You have been more help than the ENTs(which seem like a strange beast of doctors from the ones we have encountered). I hope everything can get under control because her ear bothers her so much she is unable to eat and has been drinking Ensure, eating soups, and other soft foods(a cucumber. Dentist(after an ENT office sent her there instead of taking her in) said she was a-okay but the dentist did point to the infection in the ear.
 
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Rod Moser, PA, PhD replied to Electronictoys's response:
I troubles me knowing that your partner remains in pain and this issue has not been solved. It is not that you haven't tried. Think about going to a university-based medical center ENT department so you can have a cadre of ENTs sniffing about....maybe one of them will take a personal interest in her case.


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