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positive strep blood test but negative culture
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kayla92elizabeth posted:
So the weekend before Thanksgiving in 2011 I woke up with a sore throat. I didn't think much of it because sore throats were really common for me. I had kissing tonsils when I was younger and couldn't get them removed until 3rd grade due to the insurance company. Which met lots of strep and tonsillitis and lots of prescribed antibiotics. Well then the Tuesday before thanksgiving I woke up with a rash on my legs. It was super itchy but I thought I had an allergic reaction to something and didn't think much of it because I had a doctors appointment the next morning. By the time I got to the doctors the rash had spread to my back (didn't go past my bra line), arms and butt. The rash itch so bad and felt like my skin was on fire. Without hesitation (due to my history of strep) my doctor said the rash was due to strep and gave me antibiotics. My throat looked normal but I did have a strawberry tongue. Well I got progressively worse as the week went on. My joints hurt so bad..it felt like a broke my wrist at one point and I would wake up in cold sweats but would never develop a temperature and I would sleep like no other. We finally had a blood test done and it came back positive for test. So my doctor sent me to an infectious disease specialist. She diagnosed me with Post streptococcal reactive arthritis. And prescribe for me to get a penicillin shot once a month for a year. After the penicillin shots were done I had another blood test done and I am still showing positive for strep and it's at the same levels as the first time.

I'm not sure what to think right now...Why am I still showing positive for strep and why did it not go away with all the penicillin?
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WillFull responded:
You are a cerrier for strepp. most likley, I am a Nurse, just not regestered. So you have a bacterium, Strpococus, which causes the pharyngitis (inflamed pharynx or sore throat). But after the bacteria is through running its infectious course, the bacteria sticks around kind of dormant, and alothough your culture shows gram-pos for the strepp, the bacteria is not causing any infection so your good. There can be a resistance to antibiotics, this is why you have to take the full course of antibiotics, because sometimes you feel better, but still have the bacteria. Bacteria will multiply boom! your sick again. The cool thing is that the body adapts to its enviroment. Nurses and doctor, and people who eat cockroaches have higher immune system than a normal five year old.

So your bacteria, the strepp, is really strong. It has resisted all antibiotics you through into your system and is now apart f you. You can get rid of this, but is verry difficult. Consisting of removing tonsils, and injections...this did not work for you so you are stuck with the bacteria.

But! the good news! you are now kind of immune to the disease, ussually your body will go through that type of stress and balance itself out, now you are a carrier. 10-20% of people are carriers for strepp. You will get symptoms in hightened times of stress, but should not get as sever as the previous symptoms you experianced.

To sum everything up, you are fine (as long as you still dont have the symptoms). I hope this kind of sets you mind at ease, just remember, thehuman body is a miraculous machine, and will do everything it can to protect you.

you had an autoimmune disease (the steriod), which was from the strepp, I beleive they call it rhumatic fever. Anyway your body went through alot of stress, and thats how your body balanced itself out. If you feel fine now, you most likely are.


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