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Cancer scares and hoaxs on the Internet
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An_187338 posted:
I have a friend who likes to read and send emails about the latest health crazes.

She sent me one recently about drinking cold water after a meal leads to Cancer.

I keep telling her this is a hoax and I can not find any proof that backs this up.

Another one she sent me says that Fruit should be eaten on an empty stomach. I am quite certain this is yet another hoax designed to scare people into sending emails to friends. Email spammers like to start these threads in hopes of gathering large numbers of email addresses that they can then sell.

Can anyone confirm that both of these are hoaxes please?

Thank you.
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Caprice_WebMD_Staff responded:
Hi and welcome to WebMD,

A good place to go whenever you hear something like this is snopes.com. It gives you a lot of info on the gazillion internet hoaxes out there, including the ones you mentioned:

Click here and here .

The only way I was able to stop friends and family from spreading such hoaxes and/or trying to tell me about the latest 'cures' for my health conditions, was to respond back each and every time to them (and if they sent to me among many, I responded to all so THEY wouldn't spread the hoax) with a link to the appropriate story on Snopes or quackwatch.com. It took a while but they finally stopped sending such things to me. (I suspect they still send to others but that's not my problem. )
 
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ryderse replied to Caprice_WebMD_Staff's response:
Thanks. I use snopes.com for issues just like this. The problem I have with snopes is that people don't believe that site either. I trust it but sometimes others don't.

What I am hoping to get out of this thread is for someone to debunk both of these using medical facts if at all possible.
 
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Caprice_WebMD_Staff replied to ryderse's response:
That's why I like Snopes because they use legit sources for their articles.

But you're right, some people will persist in believing the alarmist stuff that's out there. I just ignore those ones.


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