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Radiation Treatment on Liver (metastasis to liver from Colon Cancer)
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ruifan posted:
My father was diagnosed with colon cancer in August 2011. The cancer was metastasized to liver (significant coverage on the liver). He just finished his 9th round chemo treatment. His CA199 number has been reduced from 5900 to 65. His ca724 was reduced to 12. His blood test also indicated his liver is functioning normal. The latest PET CT indicated the colon cancer has reduced significantly. The cancer cells on his liver is also reducing. However there is still a large cancer cell on the liver.


His doctor is recommending to perform radiation treatment (3 x-ray beams) on the large cancer cell on his liver.

I would like to ask the following:
1) What is the effectiveness of this radiation treatment the doctor is recommending? What is the general feedback on radiation treatment after 9 rounds of Chemo treatments?
2) What kind of side effects will this radiation treatment introduce?
3) Most importantly, would this type of radiation treatment cause the cancer to spread to other areas in the body?


Thank you!
Reply
 
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ruifan responded:
Correction... my father's latest CA724 number is 27.
 
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aroucha responded:
Hi, my husband has the same cancer, he did 24 treatment of 24hs chemo, and after that just three weeks ago he started radioembolization, he did very well and he also has many leasions on the liver.That especific treatment is directed to the liver.Side effects are minimum, but my husband had a little bit of fever and had vomiting after the treatment, fadigue is the same as the chemo.My husband is a good candidate for the treatment the doctors had to make sure that nothing will invade other organs(radiation).We are hopipng that this treatment will help get to next step.My husband has lots of back pain.does your father has any problems with his back?
 
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ruifan replied to aroucha's response:
I appreciate your feedback. My Dad doesn't have any back pains. Good luck to you and your husband.
 
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brunosbud responded:
Looks like the radiation treatment recommended for your father is not SIR sphere radioembolization...Tiny synthetic spheres filled with radioactive yttrium-90 is injected into the hepatic artery from the patient's groin area.

There is some risk to SIR sphere, depending on the location of the hepatic artery in relation to the patient's stomach, for gastric ulcer. This would be disastrous for the patient and the treatment is often abandoned as a possible option.

The SIR sphere may be effective "bland". That is, the spheres are not filled with radioactive material. This is a much safer option against stomach blow-thru and it can be effective simply by choking off blood supply that feeds the growing liver mets. In other words, starving the tumors by jamming things up.

Either way, this is a liver specific treatment and it can by very helpful in fighting colon cancer cells that have spread to the liver.



My friend with cancer passed away, recently. She died primarily from liver failure. Was it the cancer? Was it the chemo? Was it the sir spheres that caused her liver to fail?

My guess was it was a combination of all three. She put up a hell of fight, nevertheless, and, good or bad, that's what her kids will take with them. What a incredible little street fighter she was.
 
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ruifan replied to brunosbud's response:
Wow! Thank you for the story. My Dad is still fighting hard. Emotionally, he is stronger than I am. The doctor is recommending him to do a XRT radiation treatment. The hospital doesn't have a Tomo-radiation machine. We are concerned about the potential damage to his liver.


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