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Acute lower abdominal pain, so far unable to diagnose
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tooyoungforcancer posted:
I'm just wondering if posting this might reach any medical minds with ideas for what might be happening to me.[br>[br>I'm having very severe pain in my lower left abdomen. The pain level has increased to the point of being nearly unable to walk. It has increased steadily over the past month or so, and two weeks ago a fever of 103.7 also propagated, which was sustained for four days (bouncing between 103.1 and 103.7F) until I realized I needed help, whereupon I was admitted to the hospital (Grant Hospital, Columbus, Ohio) and given two types of antibiotics via my IV port, which brought my fever down quickly.[br>[br>I am a 35 year old female with a history of uterine cancer; in May 2012 my uterus, ovaries, and roughly two dozen lymph nodes were removed in this area. I finished my chemo in November 2012, and then did six weeks of external beam radiation on my lower abdomen daily, followed by a couple months of internal radiation (internal to the top of the vagina) which culminated in Feb 2013. The abdominal pain began around May, 2013, mildly. It continued to get slightly worse over the weeks until in June I insisted on a CT scan which showed nothing. They suggested it could be scar tissue forming from the radiation, but have also now ruled that out.[br>[br>During my hospital stay last week which lasted for nearly the entire week, multiple teams of doctors performed many tests. Xrays, CT scans... they first assumed diverticulitis. My white count, however, was only 8. They found one small pocket of fluid (assumedly from the lymphnode removal, per my oncologist) and aspirated it. The fluid - only about 20ccs - came out clear. The cultures came back normal. The scans revealed nothing that they say they can see. After a week of being unable to figure it out, they sent me home with a barrage of antibiotics. The fever has receded, but the pain has not - not even a little. It feels exactly like what my pelvic pain felt like when I was complaining (unknowingly) about the cancer I had, but thankfully there don't seem to be any signs of cancer.[br>[br>I have some medication to help with the pain, but I can't live on these narcotics. I'm hoping someone somewhere might have another idea of what could possibly be happening. I'm only about halfway into my 14 days of antibiotics - not to mention about 3 days intravenously while in the hospital - and I was told that it should only take 36 to 48 hours to begin feeling some relief from this pain if the small pocket of fluid was really the problem. I do not think that small pocket was the problem, because I got zero relief from the aspiration.[br>[br>It is painful all the time. The pain is increased exponentially while standing up or if I lay completely flat (and stretch my abdomen out). I don't have any difficulty going to the bathroom. While my fever is down, my nausea levels are very high (no vomiting) and constant. I've kept my diet to very mild and small meals (while in the hospital I was given zero food or drink, only nutrition via the IV - no change). I don't have any swelling in my legs or feet. My lower abdomen is mildly painful to the touch all the way across, and extremely painful if pressure is applied to the left side. It's painful to laugh or cough or otherwise engage my lower ab muscles, and I have to bolster myself.[br>[br>So far, the surgery team, the oncology team, the gastroenterology team and the infectious disease team have been pawing at me with no success. If anyone has another suggestion I can bring to their attention, I would be forever grateful.[br>[br>Thanks!
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