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Sleep Apnea
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An_187235 posted:
My son is 19 years old and has lost 40 to 50 lbs. over the last 14 months. He had blood tests taken which came back normal. We are having him tested tomorrow for sleep apnea. The doctor thinks that sleep apnea may be the cause of his weight loss.[?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

He had his adnenoids removed when he was 7 years old. He still has his tonsils, and one is unusually large. His orthononist says he has tongue thrust and a narrow jaw, and recommended his jaw be broken and reset because the braces were not working. CAN THIS ALL BE RELATED?

His doctor is trying to figure out why he?s lost so much weight. She said he could have more layers of adenoids that need to be removed.

My son has taken up running and has been more active in the last year (so this is why he has lost some of the weight), but the weight loss is still excessive. Is it true that you can burn calories from sleep apnea and do you think this is why there has been such a loss of weight? Have you heard any similar stories?
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gramkay61 responded:
I've actually read and heard from my Dr. that being heavier sometimes is a reason for sleep apnea. And that when you get a cpap mach. and start sleeping better; it's more likely that you would loose weight if anything. I would read up on it. And I'm just saying that this makes sense anyway. I would guess that it's from his recent increase in activity; that will do it!! Plus he is young. That helps. But, I'm glad the Dr. is involved!


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