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Need anti-depresant that will not aggravate arrythmia
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An_255597 posted:
I have been too tired and blah for too long. I do not feel sad or that the world is awful, do not have self-loathing or hurtful thoughts but I cannot seem to get any work done around the house and I do not get involved in activities I previously enjoyed. I have serious health issues that interrupt my sleep and I do not recognize the person I have become. I can rise to the occasion if need be, but it takes a lot of extra effort. I have asked my cardiologist for an opinion on anti-depressants that will not aggravate prolonged Q or cause shortness of breath. He told me he could not help me and referred me to a new Neurologist. I have been thru all kinds of specialties and I really do not want to try a new doctor. I make a good impression and doctors seem to minimize the changes I see so clearly.
Can anyone recommend an antidepressant that does not affect cardiac patients? I want to try this before I go for further neurological evaluations. I will bring these recommendations to my PC physician who is more willing to listen and not discount my self assessment.
Thank you.
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Thomas L Schwartz, MD responded:
Hello- in general there are several antidepressants that won't increase your QTc or hurt your heart. You can always get an EKG every few weeks to be sure. Zoloft was actually studied in patients with heart attacks and came out pretty well. Prozac has been around for years and should not be a problem either, but your doc will have to make sure you are not on some other interactive drugs. EffexorXR, Pristiq, Cymbalta, Wellbutrin XL, Remeron should also be safe. You can take almost any antidepressantr except for celexa and any of the tricyclics. Again, to be safe, just ask to get an EKG about 1 week after you start a med or increase its dose....


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