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Any thoughts for husbands depression?
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Anon_168275 posted:
My husband has been diagnosed and treated for major depression for almost the past 2 years. He has gotten progressively worse despite many medication changes. He attended a day program for 6 weeks that his Psych. recommended. Despite all attempts, he has not gotten any better. I made an appt for a 2nd opinion this Monday, despite having to pay out of pocket. I brought up with his current MD that I feel that all of his behaviors/moods seem to point to something other than just depression . I'm not an expert in this field, but I'm not entirely in the dark. I'm a trauma nurse and have had my own experience with depression. I really don't know what else to do. Everything is crumbling underneath us. He also hasn't worked in 5+years. And he has 2 graduate degrees. Any thoughts/ suggestions would be appreciated.
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NedTR37 responded:
Sounds like a tough problem. While I'm not an MD, I am a life long suffer of depression and know it up close and personal. What you describe doesn't sound like a normal trajectory for this disease. Usually these serious episodes will begin to lift after a while and it sounds like your husband's situation is going the other way. Odd.

There are many diseases that have depression as a "side effect." Has he been evaluated and cleared of physical problems? Things like MS, Parkinsons's or other neurological problems can create depression along the way. Any chance he has the start of dementia? My father had that and it started very insidiously but robbed him of his usually cheery outlook early on. The problem with many of the medical experts out there is that things automatically look like problems in their specialty. Talk to a shrink and it looks like depression. To a hammer, the world looks like a nail.

I think that you are on the right track by asking basic questions about the diagnosis and the treatment protocol. Meds don't always work. Or can be impossible to get tuned so that they are effective. This is especially true for bi-polar.

Does your husband have any recurring thoughts about what he feels like doing? Does he want to disappear, move, run away or other escape? If so that might offer a clue as to what is underlying the problem. If he is suicidal that obviously is a bad sign but if he talks about it, that is a better situation that if he's thinking about it but internally. He's got options even though the options may not be all that attractive.

I'd look at the basic diagnosis and pursue the second opinion. Secondly I'd make sure that there isn't something else going on that is the primary disease. Trust your instincts!!!

Best of luck. Hang in there.


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