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    Is getting off insulin realistic?
    avatar
    elmer121 posted:
    Is it possible to get off insulin, once this therapy begins? I have 10.3 HA1C and 4+ C-Peptide, measured 2 weeks ago. The doctor changed medicine from Metformin to Janumet and said that I am "maxed out" on oral therapy. In addition, I am exhibiting signs of nerve damage and muscle weakness in the arms. In the past 2 weeks, I completly changed my life; eating right, counting carbs, and began exercising. Glucose reading improved with the restrictive diet, but are still above ADA recommendations (in excess of 115 before meals).

    The doctor said that I need to be on insulin and prescribed a pump. I am fearful that I will not be able to ever stop the insulin, once it begins. Dropping 15% of by current body weight (220 lbs and 5'7", +35 BMI).

    I don't know if I should start the insulin, or give the diet and exercise changes more time. Please give me more advice. My email addresses are:

    blee@dancon.com or elmer121@gmail.com
    Reply
     
    avatar
    auriga1 responded:
    Many diabetics can get off of insulin when they change their diet (lower their consumption of carbohydrates and lose weight) and incorporate exercise into their daily lives.

    I don't understand your doctor's prescription for an insulin pump unless your readings vary wildly from very high to very low. Your C-peptide results look like you are probably producing insulin, but are insulin resistant. Insulin resistance has a lot to do with body fat. Losing weight and increasing muscle mass may reduce that insulin resistance. Incorporating some muscle resistant exercise, such as workouts with light weights will help in fat reduction and utilize the glucose that may be running around in your system. One day you can do some sort of aerobic exercise, the next day a little weight workout.

    Keep up with the diet and exercise before you do anything. Don't become depressed if it doesn't all happen at once. Losing weight should be slow and steady.

    Let us know how you are doing.
     
    avatar
    elmer121 replied to auriga1's response:
    Thanks for your input. As an engineer, this seems to be the most logical approach, before moving to something as drastic as a pump. I also have an appt with an endocrinologist.

    Gos Bless,
    Bob
     
    avatar
    Louise_WebMD_Staff responded:
    When were you first diagnosed with diabetes? How long did you try the Metformin and Janumet?

    I am betting your c-peptide results required the straight to pump...rather than insulin shots while trying to work out oral meds.

    But-you STILL need to lose the weight, count the carbs, and exercise-even on the pump. Otherwise you will continue to do damage to your body even on the pump.
     
    avatar
    elmer121 replied to Louise_WebMD_Staff's response:
    Thanks for your input.

    God Bless,
    Bob
     
    avatar
    Louise_WebMD_Staff replied to elmer121's response:
    Good luck with the endocrinologist. Be sure to report back and let us know what you learn on that front.

    I am not a medical professional-my reply just was based on a lot of reading, tending this board, and having my mother on a pump after quite a few different oral meds and insulin injections were tried. She went on the pump and still didn't have much luck controlling things-though it was better. Then she moved here and I took over diet and prod her toward exercise-result much better A1C, the pancreatitis and the diabetic gastroparesis have both ceased to be problematic for her.
     
    avatar
    elmer121 replied to Louise_WebMD_Staff's response:
    Let you know,,,,appt w/ endo in 3/16/10 at 3pm.
     
    avatar
    starvingonsocialsecurity responded:
    Stay with the diet and exercise. I did it and got off insulin for several years. Then got lazy and put the weight back on, bam back on 90 units of Humalog a day..... I insurance co wants me to use Novalog........... costs twice as much and medicare won't cover insulin............. Gotta love obcare. only going to get worse.
     
    avatar
    An_245101 replied to starvingonsocialsecurity's response:
    Sorry you are posting to someone who has not been here since the post - which was 3 yrs ago.


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