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Diabetes and HPV (genital warts)
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An_202576 posted:
I have been seeing this guy for a couple months now. He is insulin dependant. It appears that we may soon start having sex, but I recently had a pap come back abnormal and it seems I may have HPV. I have not brought this up to him yet as I have nothing solid to give him. But since the odds are that it's HPV, I wanted to see if this could affect his diabetes or immune system or anything in anyway. Is there any male on here who knows he has both of these and has there been any problems or could there be potential problems for him if we have sex and he contracts this? I have been searching the internet and have been unable to find any info.
Thanks
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flutetooter responded:
Put STD (sexually transmitted disease) into your search engine like Google and it will give you all the information you need. You must tell your partner because this will affect his life and health from now on and the life and health of any future children. Also, talk to your doctor about how to keep from spreading this to others. Condoms are not 100% effective against transmission and neither is anything else except abstention because this virus is not always stopped by birth control methods.
 
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jbeadmom4 replied to flutetooter's response:
I am specifically trying to find information about HPV and how it might affect people with Diabetes. The goal is to become educated for him and share what I have found before we take the next step. I guess I was hopeing that maybe someone on here has already delt with this and might be able to shed some light on it. The question is are there any dangers to diabetic people that someone without diabetes might not have to worry about.
 
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flutetooter replied to jbeadmom4's response:
I know that it is late at night and this is not the answer that you might want. Are you the same person as the "Anon" who began this post?

Unfortunately HPV is "the gift that keeps on giving". It can be spread from person to person, and can affect newborn babies tragically. Would want someone to give you this "gift"?

A person with diabetes is already challenged in the area of health, and any contagious virus or any additional disease or health issue would probably be harder to deal with than for a totally healthy person I am somewhat confused about your issue here. Would you be more comfortable giving a diabetic (or anybody), hepatatis, pneumonia, measles, whatever? Would you be more comfortable in giving HPV to a non-diabetic? In other words, it is not safe or advisable to give HPV to ANYBODY. Please contact your doctor for information.
 
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rubystar2 replied to flutetooter's response:
Anon, I would consult a doctor about this situation you are facing. I can never recommend the use of condoms strongly enough. There are many diseases out there to be spread around by sexually active people. The more partners one has in a lifetime, the more likely STD's will be spread. Please consult a doctor to see if there are any anti-viral medications to take to reduce the likely hood of a flare up. And, please, use condoms. Yes, as mentioned above they are not 100% effective but they do a dang good job of reducing the spread of disease.


HPV Treatment


HPV information
 
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krhudson responded:
Honestly, you need to have a discussion with him and if you two are serious then you need to both go and see his edocrinologist and get this cleared somehow. I am a type 1 diabetic and I would have to decline a partner that had the problem you may have. From a Medical standpoint I do not have any facts to share with you. Diabetes is a very complex and can be stressful to manage and is an autoimmune disease and just by you inquiring and knowing enough to ask means that you are concerned. I would refrain from the casual sex since you have been with him 2 months and if you two want to be in a relationship please see his Dr. and base the decision on the percentage of a chance he can get it. If you do get serious together, also check out his lifestyle and be sure to be adaptable to it. Get educated about Diabetes and the challenges and the moods and all of it and not let emmotions drive you to this decision. I think a diabetic will have a tougher road ahead if he contracts this in comparison to a non diabetic. Maybe the Dr. will see this and shed some light on it. Good Luck.

krhudson
 
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Louise_WebMD_Staff responded:
I encourage you to ask Terri Warren -our expert on the STDs and Sexual Conditions exchange-she is an expert on HPV and genital herpes.
 
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jbeadmom4 replied to Louise_WebMD_Staff's response:
Thank you everyone for your answers to the question. As for flutetooter....It's not really cool for you to assume that I am not telling him or that I am 16 or that I am giving anything willingly to anyone else, like someone apparently gave to me at some point in my life. I needed more information so that when we do talk about it, I have some information to share with him and at that point we can make furthure decisions. Given that 80 percent of the population have HPV....I think it's safe to assume that some of those people also have diabetes. I plan on also asking my doctor when I go in for my biopsy and keep researching. If he decides he doesn't want to risk it, then so be it. I care abou him too much to not tell him or put his health at risk if there is in fact health risks involved with something like warts.
But thank you again for the more educational answers I was looking for from everyone else. I do appreciate it.
 
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jbeadmom4 replied to krhudson's response:
I already stated that I would be talking to him about this. Why do people reiterate it?
 
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Michael Dansinger, MD replied to jbeadmom4's response:
Thanks for your important question about HPV in people with diabetes. I am not aware of any studies that indicate that HPV is more problematic in people with diabetes, although it seems plausible that it could be, since diabetes that is not well controlled can worsen immuniity.

I think it is thoughtful on your part to research the information about this topic to share with him. I'm sorry to learn that you have to deal with this kind of stuff at all.

Michael Dansinger, MD
 
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jbeadmom4 replied to Michael Dansinger, MD's response:
Thank you doctor for your response. His diabetes is well controlled it seems. He takes very good care of himself and is very active. My concern would be that the HPV would affect his diabetes....but it seems that the diabetes is actually what makes anything else contracted bad. I guess I don't know enough about the betes. So it affects the strength of your immunity? And thus if he gets sick with anything it just makes it that harder to fight off?
 
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Michael Dansinger, MD replied to jbeadmom4's response:
I think that is a fair statement. The immune system depends in large part on the proper functioning of white blood cells. Unfortunately the white blood cells work rather poorly when blood sugar levels are high. That is why people with diabetes tend to suffer from more than their fair share of bacterial infections, including skin infections, pneumonia, bladder infections, foot ulcers, gum disease, etc.

Viral infections may tend to last longer if immunity is compromised, and it is plausible that they are more prevalent as well perhaps depending on the virus type. I did not see anything to suggest a significant link between HPV and diabetes, however.

Michael Dansinger, MD
 
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An_258012 responded:
I know that this post has been here for quite some time so God knows if you'll even see this but, do yourself a favor and don't listen to even one person that has replied to your post. The proof that no one here other than the doctor that chimed in knows what they're talking about is the fact they're calling is an STD. HVP is not, I repeat NOT an STD, it is STI. And just like any infection clear it up and your fine. The truth is which no one here seems to know is that you already had it, so does everyone else. Potentially more than one strain. It is a fact confirmed by the CDC the number is 75%. And, being that most do not show symptoms the actual number is around 90-95%. It's labeled the common cold for the sexual active word for a reason. The only real concern is the DNA of the strain that you carry. To whether is low to high risk.

But absolutely you should tell him. Why wouldn't you. You care for him yeah, so tell him. But don't tell him in a freak out manner, educate yourself and him. Let me ask you this, are you afraid to give him chicken pocks? Well, it's pretty much the same thing. Clearly not the same infection but an infection none the less, NOT a disease, there is a difference. But just like chicken pocks it will stay in your system. That's why it has the 'potential' to come back. And, unless you have a high risk strain the odds are it won't. But it is something you should speak to your Doctor about, and him. Because it is something that you should take care of. But don't let the ignorance and fear of other dictate your actions and behavior. Most that chime in on things haven't the slightest clue what they're talking about. Well I get every word I speak from a Doctor. I don't chime in otherwise. And I've spoken to several about this very topic. From here and abroad.


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