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New type 1 oral insulin
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Heliamedical posted:


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE




Raleigh, NC, USA July 27, 2010


Helia Medical and Siogen Biotech announced today that they have finalized an agreement for the development of a new oral insulin delivery system for type 1 diabetes. The arrangement, which is effective as of July 20, 2010, provides for the development of a Siosome® nanoparticle containing synthetic human insulin designed to be administered orally and then time-released into the bloodstream over a 12-hour period. Financial terms and specific details have not been disclosed.


Under the agreement, Helia Medical and Siogen Biotech shall work together to develop this drug for canine type 1 diabetes. The project shall commence in the third quarter of 2010. The partnership on this project will lead the veterinary and medical world to a new personalized method to manage diabetes in a more controlled and patient-friendly manner.


Siogen Biotech is Malaysia based company that focuses on developing nanoparticle delivery systems for many different drugs, compounds and substances. Siogen is a world leader in the production of silane-based nanoparticles. Siogen's main office is located in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia and has other facilities in Germany and the UK. www.siogen.com


Helia Medical is a Wisconsin based company with operations in Raleigh, North Carolina. Helia Medical's mission is developing novel and effective drugs, devices and nanoparticles for the veterinary medical world. Helia Medical uses many cutting-edge human medical developments and applies them to veterinary medical applications. www.heliamedical.com


Helia Medical and Siogen Biotech look forward to working together on this project as well as others in the future. Many of the developments from this partnership should directly advance not only veterinary medicine, but also human medicine worldwide.






SOURCE Helia Medical www.heliamedical.com Copyright (C) 2010

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MrsCora01 responded:
Theoretically interesting, but do you have any idea how long it takes to go from proposing to trying something in animals (dogs in this case) to actually seeing early trials in humans? And from there getting it to market? I personally think that this is in the category of what T1s have been told since the 60s....."there will be a cure in 10 years". They've revived this every decade and it has yet to pass.

Cora
T1 1966, Dialysis 2001, kidney transplant and pump 2002, pancreas transplant 2008
 
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Heliamedical replied to MrsCora01's response:
Mrs. Cora,

I came up with the oral siosome insulin idea on May 4, 2010. We are trying to move fast on this, and get in veterinary in 3 years. I believe it might take 7 years to get into human medicine. I get frustrated too when I see a child or person who has a disability that I know we could help. I feel down that I can't create something new quickly and help them. I guess the solution is to make drug approval time and procedure faster by making it a key point of elections to the House and Senate. The FDA could move faster if new laws were put into place to expedite things, however we are sue happy society and hence the process we now have.

As a company Helia can't afford the approx. $80M to take this to market. I personally try to do the best I can and use the gifts God gave me. I think that is all I can do. I believe this application, if successful, will be for sale sooner in other countries before the US. Please understand that there are some of us out in the world trying to help and we don't worry about money so much as we do who we can help.

Leigh
 
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MrsCora01 replied to Heliamedical's response:
Thanks Leigh. Believe me, I know how hard all you folks in research work and I share the frustration too. I think the unfortunate part is that you are forced to strike a very difficult balance. You need funding, so you need publicity to get that funding. Then what happens is that the media runs with it, touts it as a cure, and gets everyone all excited. Lots of docs then read about it (in regular media or in science journals) and start telling their patients about when they will be cured. And that just doesn't happen.

The really sad part is that because of the lag time and the unfortunate fact that some things/research studies just don't work out as planned, the conspiracy theorists start getting into the equation. They point to the fact that such-and-such was announced X number of years ago and that there is still no result. Prompting the insinuation that you are somehow "hiding" the cure.

I try hard not to be the voice of gloom and doom, but the truth is that all types of diabetes are in and of themselves quite complex and many folks just don't appreciate how many different systems in the body can be involved in getting something new to work.

I do appreciate how much you folks are doing. I was dxd in 1966 - and boy was the technology available primitive in those days. Many diabetics today don't really appreciate the strides that have been made, thanks to folks like you. Home glucose testing, a1c tests, better insulins, and insulin pumps to name just a few.

Keep up the good work.

Cora
T1 1966, Dialysis 2001, kidney transplant and pump 2002, pancreas transplant 2008


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