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How Does Saturated Fat Cause High Cholesterol?
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Michael Dansinger, MD posted:
It is pretty much "common knowledge" that doctors discourage eating much fatty meat, cheese, cream, butter, etc. because these foods promote heart disease.

Doctors agree that the saturated fat in these foods increase the LDL "bad" cholesterol (and LDL particle) levels, which in turn promote atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease. I would consider this to be "common knowledge" among educated laypeople who are trying to lead healthy lives. (This is not my main point, however).

The main point of this post is to challenge you to see how long it takes you to use the internet to come up with an explanation (from a trustworthy source) for why saturated fat raises LDL cholesterol levels.

Go ahead--time yourself to see how long it takes you to answer this seemly straightforward question. "How does dietary saturated fat cause high blood cholesterol levels?"

If you find a good link, please share it.

Michael Dansinger, MD
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phototaker responded:
I skimmed through this article, as I have to rush out today, but this seemed to discuss the topic. I did see a mention of margarine, which I thought was proven to be not as good as butter, health wise. Maybe they were talking about the newer plant based magarines? I'll read more later. I "think" you wanted "how" does the saturated fat cause high blood cholesterol levels.
I'll check that more later, too.

http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/chol/wyntk.htm
 
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DavidHueben responded:
Here are three sources that I consider trustworthy (American Heart Association, the National Institutes of Health, and the Mayo Clinic):

http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=532
AHA

http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/chol/wyntk.htm#levels NIH

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/fat/NU00262
Mayo Clinic

David
Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack. - General George Patton Jr
 
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DavidHueben responded:
P.S. It took me about two minutes. I spent more time cutting and pasting URL's and formatting my reply than finding information!!!

DMH
Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack. - General George Patton Jr
 
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xring responded:
I found these two links in one minute just by searching "Saturated fat increases cholesterol:"

http://search.yahoo.com/r/_ylt=A0oGdWmFCWBNhmAALLFXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTByZWgwN285BHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMQRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkAw--/SIG=13a9t0c6d/EXP=1298168325/**http%3a//wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/2011/01/does-dietary-saturated-fat-increase.html

http://search.yahoo.com/r/_ylt=A0oGdWmFCWBNhmAANrFXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTByamR1NnFoBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDNgRjb2xvA3NrMQR2dGlkAw--/SIG=138jfkgr1/EXP=1298168325/**http%3a//www.3fatchicks.com/cholesterol-saturated-fat-understand-how-theyre-connected/

Another interesting note: People are always told to "Trim away the visible fat around beef & pork & don't eat chicken skin," etc. but the cholesterol is found in the lean portion of the meat/chicken/fish.
Politicians should serve two terms. One in office and one in prison
 
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phototaker replied to DavidHueben's response:
David, could you tell me how you make the links? I think someone mentioned that before, but I thought it was just for if you post the discussion. Thanks!

I usually just cut and paste it.
 
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DavidHueben replied to phototaker's response:
Photo:

I didn't do anything special. I just copied the links into my reply and they were automatically shown as clickable URL's.

If that doesn't work, you can always highlight the URL with your mouse and click the "link icon" on the toolbar.

DMH
Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack. - General George Patton Jr
 
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DavidHueben replied to xring's response:
Xring:

Do you consider Whole Health Souce and 3 Fat Chicks to be trustworthy and reputable sources of information and advice?

Hopefully, I read the first link correctly. It seems to suggest that saturated fats and elevated cholesterol levels are not much of a risk. That would seem to be at odds with the premise that Dr. Dansinger offerd in the original post.

I am curious. Do you feel that eating too much saturated fat and elevated cholesterol levels contribute to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease or not?

DMH
Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack. - General George Patton Jr
 
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phototaker responded:
I have a question for you, Dr. D. I've been eating an egg a day, these past 6 months, knowing that egg yolks are said not to be eaten more than two times a week. I do mix my egg with plain Eggbeaters for an omelet or my French toast made with a Lite English muffin and cinnamon mixture. I've read conflicting things on eggs and cholesterol. Do you feel eggs should only be eaten two days a week to maintain low cholesterol? I used to do egg whites only, but then read other things that made me question this. I don't know the sources of where I read this.
 
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xring replied to DavidHueben's response:
It's hard to say. Some studies seem to show a link between elevated cholesterol levels and cardiovascular disease & some do not. Also, there are places in the world where the population has typically high cholesterol levels & low cardiovascular disease rates & vice versa.

Personally, I keep my saturated fat intake low mostly because that has enabled me to maintain my 70 lb. weight loss.
Politicians should serve two terms. One in office and one in prison
 
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DavidHueben replied to phototaker's response:
Photo:

Without debating whether cholesterol contributes to cardiovascular disease and other health risks (that is a whole different discussion), I will simply state in the facts.

The suggested daily intake of cholesterol is 300mg. For those who have a history of hyperlipidemia, which you do and I do as well, your doctor/CDE/dietitian may have suggested a lower daily limit. In my case, I was told to keep my daily cholesterol intake to 200mg or less.

One medium egg contains 186mg of cholesterol or 93% of my daily limit.

One large egg contains 212mg of cholesterol or 106% of my daily limit.

That is why I only have eggs once in a blue moon.

If you are on a restricted cholesterol diet, you would almost consume your daily limit of cholesterol or exceed it with the daily consumption of one egg. That would rule out any meat or animal based product for the remainder of the day. And, I know you eat meat, fish, and poultry. So, again if you are on a restricted cholesterol diet, you would be exceeding your limit every single day.

Has your doctor given you a daily limit for cholesterol intake? If not, you should ask for one. Perhaps if you only ate eggs occasionally, you could reduce your statin dosage and lower your LDL.

DMH
Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack. - General George Patton Jr
 
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phototaker replied to DavidHueben's response:
David, up until 6 months ago, I hadn't eaten eggs regularly, mostly egg whites and eggbeaters. I wanted to see if I would see a difference. I don't. I started the higher doses of statins a year ago. Maybe if I was off statins all together I would. I do watch my cholesterol mostly on other things, BUT you're right, I do have lean beef, white meat chicken,(which I eat mostly), once in a while, lamb or veal...once a month), and fish like salmon and tuna. I use "I Can't Believe it's not Butter Light" on my English muffin half in the morning. I use mostly mustard on all my 1/2 sandwiches. The only time I use the lower fat mayo is with tuna, which I eat one can a week, when I do eat it. I spray my omelet pan with Pam. If I have cheese now(at Christmas I had some Havarti), I used mostly low fat shredded Mozzarelli or Parmesan sprinkled on vegetables(once in a while) or when I make whole wheat thin spaghetti.
 
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DavidHueben replied to phototaker's response:
Photo:

Those are all good things to do. Not to beat a dead horse, but I will ask again. Has your doctor given you a maximum daily limit for cholesterol intake?

If you are interested in lowering your LDL level (I thought you were) and reducing your dosage of statins, then the daily consumption of one egg a day, plus one daily four ounce serving of either lean beef, chicken breast, or salmon (each has about 70mg of cholesterol) will put you at at or above the limit and make it more difficult to either lower your LDL or reduce your statin usage. You basically could have nothing with cholesterol the remainder of the day.

Why not just reduce your egg consumption?


DMH
Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack. - General George Patton Jr
 
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phototaker replied to DavidHueben's response:
No, I get "no" guidance from my doctor in what I'm eating. I did go to a nutritionist, but I knew more than she did.
 
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DavidHueben replied to phototaker's response:
Photo:

It is very unfortunate that you get no nutritional advice from your doctor and that you had an incompetent nutritionist. Basically, that means that you are "flying blind" when it comes to daily nutritional intake. It makes it difficult to achieve targets when you don't know what you are shooting at.

Let me suggest you ask for specific daily carbohydrate, cholesterol, and caloric limits the next time you see your doctor. Then, closely track your consumption on a daily basis to see if you are complying.

That is the only way I know to meet your goals of losing weight, improving glucose control, lowering your LDL, and reducing your dosage of statins.

DMH
Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack. - General George Patton Jr


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