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Oh Pooh!
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barb10562 posted:
Just a reminder ( mostly to myself ) to read labels. Last night I made Bourbon Beef tips from Stouffers and I ate the beef and about a tablespoon of mashed potatoes -gave almost all to DH- and this morning fasting was 158! Looked at the carbs on the dinner box and they were 61!! The beef tips alone were too much for me I guess. Will know better next time. But BOY were they good! Have a good day everyone!!
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phototaker responded:
In the beginning, it's always interesting to find these things out.
Good for you for checking after testing. Testing is so important to knowing what you can and cannot eat.

I remember the time I figured out that I had to look at the serving sizes on packages, and saw that the carbs I was calculating were for two servings, not one. It's important to check "all" of that out. I recently saw that on my calcium supplements, also, and was surprised that I was supposed to be taking two tablets at a time. It's good to check everything!
 
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hootyowl2 responded:
If you made those with bourbon, the alcohol may be what shot your blood sugars up. Alcohol has a lot of sugars. Not sure what other ingredients that would have, but that is one culprit.

If I eat ramen noodles, they send my blood sugars up in the 400 and ER range, so no thank you to those for me.

Hooty
 
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DavidHueben replied to hootyowl2's response:
Hooty:

Distilled spirits such as bourbon and scotch have zero grams of carbohydrates and zero grams of sugars.

Actually, alcohol tends to lower, not raise, blood glucose levels. That is because the liver will make detoxification of the alcohol its first priority, instead of releasing stored glucose as needed. That causes lower blood glucose levels.


David
Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack. - General George Patton Jr
 
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arealgijoe replied to DavidHueben's response:
I just learned that a few years ago...

The first time I drank at a party I feared my drinking would be obvious the next morning after.......... instead I felt better than ever instead. When I was in Navy A-school I would go out for just a couple drinks the nite before exams. It was my way to be at my best for the tests and it worked great. Now I know WHY.

Hey DH...how about an update?..... please

Gomer
 
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nwsmom replied to hootyowl2's response:
When you cook with alcoholic beverages, the alcohol will evaporate, leaving only the flavors. There should be no alcohol remaining in "Bourbon Beef".
 
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cookiedog replied to nwsmom's response:
My liver doctor and transplant dietician disagree with this. They say some level of alcohol often remains in the dish.

I am not even allowed to use little bottles of flavoring if they are alcohol based.
http://www.recipes4us.co.uk/Cooking%20With%20Alcohol.htm

The doctor said to be especially careful of wine based dishes in restaurants.
 
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phototaker replied to cookiedog's response:
That's interesting, Cookiedog. That's especially why I like WebMd and my other diabetes blog. You can find out so much from other people's doctors or specialists. That doesn't rule out that you have to then check out the information, though, for yourself. I learn so much here.


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