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Dr. Dansinger I am non-diabetic; glucose was 114 on routine fasting blood test
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Anon_51772 posted:
Dr. Dansinger, I am not a diabetic, but my recent routine fasting blood glucose concerned me as it measured 114.

The routine blood test was taken the day after a party where I had an unusual 3 cupcakes which each had an unusual amount of a favorite icing and I also had one rare sugared 12 oz can of soda. I know it was too much and I am embarrassed and sorry I did it.

Even though I fasted for 9 hours after the party before the blood test the next morning, could that party food have affected my glucose reading somewhat?

My primary care doctor commended me on my loss of 18 pounds over the last year, especially as I also went through menopause at the same time which is apparently when women put on weight due to lessened estrogen.

I have been actively on a weight loss, nutrition and daily walking lifestyle change for the past year. I plan to continue my focus on nutrition and walking 1-3 miles daily. I want to lose another 35 - 55 pounds over the next year or two to get to healthy goal weight.

Dr. Dansinger is it possible the routine fasting blood test was affected by the unusual out of my ordinary number of party treats I had the day before?
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Michael Dansinger, MD responded:
Hopefully this is a "false alarm" but I'd still take that 112 very seriously. I encourage you to follow up with a hemoglobin A1c test to get a better picture of your overall blood sugar control. A 9-hour fast should do a pretty good job of "normalizing" the blood sugar below 110 in someone without "prediabetes", but the A1c test carries more meaning in my view.

In any case, you are clearly on the right path with the weight loss, nutrition, and exercise. I applaud you on the 18 pounds so far, and your plans to lose much more. I believe we should all be acting like we're fighting diabetes, whether we have it or not.

Michael Dansinger, MD
 
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reitze responded:
is it possible the routine fasting blood test was affected by the unusual out of my ordinary number of party treats I had the day before?

yes, especially if you ate something similar in meals before/after that (even if that was something you thought fine, like bread).

I'm not a Dr but I was diabetic 4 years ago and after 3 months Atkins-like dieting (avoiding sugar-blasts like you had) my average BG reduced from 350 to 150, and another 3 months loosing weight while returning a few carbs,... my BG returned to an average 95-100.

These days I eat pretty normally including pizza, beer, chips, etc, but if I were to pile on suggar like 3 cupcakes w/ soda-sugar, pizza, pasta, and stuff like that, I could see my BG#s rise again.

The upside for me is, like you, putting my brain in control over my weight and paying enough attention to food choices/effects to obtain health beyond what I had ever expected to enjoy again in my lifetime.

Hope that helps, God Bless!
 
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reitze replied to Michael Dansinger, MD's response:
I believe we should all be acting like we're fighting diabetes, whether we have it or not.

Hi Doc, I think that's good advice!

One thing I've noticed is that the dietary good advice for diabetics has much in common with cancer and other health conditions from the alternative medicine voices that have crossed my research-readings. As things like toxins often manifest in multiple ways, dietary and sedentary abuses can manifest in similarly multiple ways. An example I observed was research into amines of a building's steam leak with 25 possible manifestations with everything from rashes to stones and diabetes, hmmmm. anyway...

As far as the "ideal diet" there of course is no such thing due to the spectrum of individual needs. Yet the Mediterranean-diet's-food-pyramid and those DTD live/dead food pics I posted on my profile seem IMHO good guide-posts for those in need of information on where to start when faced with a realization of a problem. And once onto the body's most sensitive indicator of environment/dietary health - wow the results are great. Thanks for your interest and commitment in passing it along!

BTW, I received a tooth-cap from a fantastic dentist yesterday who has my business after my wife and I had a horrible experience at the more corporate-flavored dentist who wanted to pull all her teeth, and destroy one of mine to "save" another tooth next to it that's still fine now 4 years later. Her teeth are good now after a couple of caps (all she needed, rather than the false teeth they specialized in selling). There seriously are GOOD and BAD doctors, detists, etc.

1 more idea, rather than retoric of "FIGHTING" some may respond better to "optimizing health" via diet, AND moderation of many things including such things as coffee, etc.
 
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brunosbud replied to reitze's response:
Agreed. But, here's the reality...


My best friend is battling Stage 4 Colorectal cancer at the moment.

When it comes to exercise and diet, she's received no guidance, no recommendations from her oncologist, surgeon, or GP...

None.

Exercise and proper diet fall outside the bounds of standard accepted treatment of stg 4 colon cancer (even though she's missing 75% of her colon!). Approved cancer fighting by the AMA for stage 4 involves surgery, chemo drugs and radiation. Anything outside those "choices" is viewed as "alternative" treatment and you are warned to tread lightly in this area.


This is not a critique of the skill and extraordinary knowledge her physicians possess. If not for them, there's no question my friend would not be alive, today.

But, anyone surviving Stage 4 Colon cancer will tell you this: You can follow conventional cancer treatment and accept the doctor's prognosis of lifetime maintenance chemo and permanent disability...

But, for those that will accept nothing less than a "cure" (or die trying), at some point in time, you have to step outside your doctors advice because their training does not a allow for therapies other than surgery, chemo or radiation...Even though they tell the patient, "You will never be cancer-free."


So, I asked my friend, "How's that work for you?"

My friend: "It doesn't."
 
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celery56 responded:
Anon
Don't ever base a medical decision on a one time reading.
Your cupcakes and soda might have led to that reading but 114 is not anything to be alarmed about. Take a few more fasting Blood Sugars and get an A1C- take a deep breath and relax.
 
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celery56 replied to reitze's response:
You said BG three times - did you mean Blood Sugar?
what the hell is BG
 
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brunosbud replied to celery56's response:
BG is Blood Glucose
 
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stevewwp replied to Michael Dansinger, MD's response:
Hi Dr Dansinger

I guess I ought to be alarmed or ashame. My A1C has been between 8 and 10 for the last couple of years. Ironically, I have been spared all the symptoms. My podiatric checks showed perfectly normal responses. My retina scans were normal so much so that the eye specialist commented "for someone with a 10 history of diabetes, you must be controlling your BG very well". Sadly, I don't really make enough effort.

My weight has been stable and my BMI (24) is borderline between normal and overweight. I have normal blood pressure.
My cholesterol scores are normal for all the indicators. A few years ago, I had tingling sensations in my hands but they stopped after I took some liquid L-carnitine without consulting my doctor.
For a 56year old, my skin is wrinkle-free.

I am presently on Medformin (850mg) morning & evening and diamicron (80mg) for breakfast & lunch. Now I have started taking alpha lipoic acid which some websites say is good for reversing the bad effects of diabetes.

So, the questions are :
- is ALA really good for diabetics?
- is it true that Medformin has anti-aging side effects?
- if my present medications are not effective, what other options should I take short of insulin jabs? I am asking this question here because my doctor seems reluctant to prescribe anything else.

Will appreciate yr advice,
Steve
 
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jasononsweets replied to stevewwp's response:
Steve, I've also been between 8-10 on the A1c for about 10 years without complications so I guess it doesn't affect everyone adversely.
 
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laura2gemini2 replied to jasononsweets's response:
The problem is, you may have complications without having side effects. People dont have symptoms of kidney failure sometimes till they end up on dialysis. Some people dont realize that they are slowly losing feeling in their feet until there is an injury that just wont heal and they end up losing the limb. You may not notice small hormone changes till it causes osteoperosis or low T (for boys) and abnormal hair and skin growth (for girls).

If you have the ability to fix something that's wrong now, why wait till something happens that you cant fix?
 
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Indianarose replied to Michael Dansinger, MD's response:
Doc, I thought 160 was the number to be concerned with
with a fasting glucose test?
 
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auriga1 replied to Indianarose's response:
Not the doc, but a fasting glucose of 160 is waaaaay high. If one is a diabetic, their numbers for fasting should be between 70-110. Some doctors like the numbers to be at 70-100.
 
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reitze replied to celery56's response:
I siad BG to mean Blood Glucose (aka blood sugar test #).
 
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reitze replied to auriga1's response:
I'm happy being 90 to 130 and get numbers like that all the time after 3 years reversed type 2 without drugs. Not that I've reversed I can see there are correlations from my food to my numbers too.

Like today it was 117 (a.m. pre-food) after yesterday I ate pizza, chips, beer, etc. The pizza seemed a lot. A few days ago it was 91 and that was on a morning after a day of hard physical work splitting firewood.

The point of a number over 115 is "hay watch yourself - and behave a bit better for a few days". Thankfully after 3 years reversed that doesn't radically restrict my diet any more... just throttles the beer and candy.


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