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Eating Right Is So Hard
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candy352 posted:
Eating right is hard, but I feel that I have really made some great accomplishments. I have a lot more work to do though. My insulin has been reduced and I now I only take Novolin N, 16 units at bedtime. My sugar levels have been pretty good during the day, but are a little high after dinner. My fasting numbers are beautiful and there are one or two high numbers after lunch, but all of my post-dinner numbers are high. I don't know if it is because the insulin doesn't have an effect by that time or what I am eating. I really don't want to take any more insulin. I love just taking that dosage at bedtime. I'm thinking that maybe I should just have less carbs at dinner. What do you guys think?
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ami_nix responded:
You probably should cut down on your carbs at dinner but, be sure to talk to your OB. I know that the baby needs a certain amount of carbs and because I was diagnosed so late in my pregnancy, I never found out exactly how to balance those carbs to stay healthy and keep baby healthy. How far along are you now?
Noah's Mom~"Don't worry that children never listen to you; worry that they are always watching you." - Robert Fulghum
 
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auriga1 responded:
Sounds like what you are eating at dinner time is elevating your post-prandial numbers. Your best bet is to cut down on the carbs at that mealtime. A basal insulin does not bring your numbers down if you eat too many carbs at one meal. Only a rapid-acting insulin such as Humalog or Novolog can do that. They are designed to take with meals to prevent any spikes from the carbs you eat at that particular meal.

It doesn't hurt to experiment with eating less carbs. Be sure to test yourself two hours later to see if this helps. If not, talk with your doctor because you don't want to keep spiking. That doesn't help you in the long run.
 
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candy352 replied to auriga1's response:
My OB also thinks that I should watch what I'm eating at dinnertime at have fewer carbs at that meal. Last night, I did pretty well. After dinnner, my sugar was 91. The OB recommends I have no more than 30-45 carbs at dinner, so I'm working on that. I am 30 weeks now. Soo excited.

@auriga I actually test one hour later. I will see the doctor next Monday and talk about my numbers again. I'll see how everything is then and if my diet has been working.
 
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auriga1 replied to candy352's response:
My endo and dietician recommended the 30-35 grams of carbs per meal, too. I usually do less, so I can take less insulin. I do take two insulins, one basal and the rapid-acting. At diagnosis, my diabetes was uncontrolled. Much better these days with an A1C of 5.8.

I would be excited, too. Almost there. Congratulations.

Are you diagnosed with gestational diabetes or have you always been?

If you're doctor told you to test one hour later, by all means stick with it. Mine told me two hours. Your BS will be higher at one hour than it will be at two hours. If your BS returns to normal two hours after a meal, there is nothing to worry about.

I've eaten "right" for most of my life and couldn't figure out why I just can eat carbs at all. Basically, I'm "allergic." Any kind of carbs raise my blood sugar dramatically.

Hopefully, this less carbs thing will help. It does for me. Good luck and let us know how you fare after your doctor's appt.
 
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candy352 replied to auriga1's response:
I was diabetic before pregnancy. I've been Type 2 for about 4 years. My numbers are looking pretty good so far. I'll keep you guys updated.
 
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rocketbob responded:
Eating right is hard and it didn't get easier after I was diagnosed this Labor day. Prior to that event the only consideration I gave to food was when do I eat and is there enough. Now it would seem whatever I would have the most of is that which I should but nibble of. Now I dream of banana cream pie even though I havn't had any in ten years cause its not available around here. Its as though diabetes has made me a kid in a candy store with no money. I am pretty sure my current obsession with food is just a mask of denial hiding my unacceptance of this diabetic condition. If I fully accepted the diagnosis then would I not see this change of diet as par for the course? I mean whenever I had a n abcessed tooth I never argued with the dentist about pulling it out, nor did I spend much time greving the loss that troublesome tooth. Consequently, should I not reflect the same upon that box of swiss cake rolls that I really don't miss. So, the reality is the better health I might achieve through diet and exercise far out weighs the outcome of not doing so and the bemoanment of all those indulgences that were killing me. In conclusion Candy 352,( I salivate at the mention of candy) less carbs at dinner is a very good Idea.
 
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candy352 replied to rocketbob's response:
LOL wow. You made me so hungry. I'm like Homer Simpson over here now, drooling all over my keyboard! Mmm, banana cream pie. I think it's easier to go along with a dentist's recommendation and not even think about it. When it comes to a diet due to diabetes, it is about a lifestyle change. I think that's what makes it so difficult. I have to do a lot of thinking of the future. What is that pie going to do to my sugar? How is it going to affect me and my baby? Sometimes that helps, other times it's like maybe it won't be too bad of an idea. I have such a weakness for carbs!!!! I miss my potatoes and cornbread.


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