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sweet potatoes vs baked potatoes
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tweetybirdgirl posted:
was told by my Diabetes Councelor that a sweet potatoe is no different than a baked potatoe...

i thought sweet potatoes or yams had more nutritional value...

Please help

c lozano
albuquerque, nm
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Haylen_WebMD_Staff responded:
Your counselor might be talking about the way each affects blood sugar.

Click below to access a WebMD tool where you can find nutrition facts including calories, fat, carbohydrates, protein, sugar, fiber in over 37,000 foods and beverages.

WebMD Food-o-meter

Hope this helps!

Haylen
 
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Michael Dansinger, MD responded:
Sweet potato has a bit more fiber than a baked potato. That slight difference can be viewed as trivial by some, or as meaningful by others.

For each sweet potato consumed in America, I'll bet there are another 10 white potatoes consumed. By making sweet potatoes "fair game" and white potatoes "food to avoid", it can create an arbitrary distinction that works well within the context of a "moderate carb" or "carb resistricted" eating plan. Most moderate carb eating plans draw arbitrary lines intended to allow some but not all "borderline foods" that are high in both fiber and starch.
 
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Hootyowl2 responded:
Potatoes have a lot of nutrition in them, it is usually the toppings we use that get us into trouble. Sweet potatoes have a lot of beta carotene, a precursor to Vitamin A. Personally, I do not avoid potatoes of any kind, but I do try to limit their intake.

http://www.organicfacts.net/organic-vegetables/organic-potato/nutritional-value-of-potato.html

http://www.slhfarm.com/spudfacts.html

http://www.idahopotato.com/nutrition_education

http://rosie2010.hubpages.com/hub/SWEET-POTATO-Health-Benefits-Nutrition-Facts-History-and-Recipes

These are just a few articles re the benefits of eating potatoes. I used to eat a lot more potatoes, and actually weighed much less. I think I need to eat more potatoes again.

Hooty
 
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MockBe responded:
i like the sweet potatoe, vs the white potatoe, as it seems to not send me into a spike.

although, it is important to remember that what you put in it or on it can make a big difference.
 
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tweetybirdgirl replied to Hootyowl2's response:
Hootyowl,

Yeah I like YOUR idea about eating more potatoes! LOL

I guess in moderation most things are okay as long as it is in the carb range i am allowed to eat each meal... I used to eat the whole potatoe with sour cream, butter... now i eat half of that of either sweet potatoes or white potatoes but not very often....

I love your name as i am fascinated with owls!! love them!

tweetybird girl
 
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Hootyowl2 replied to tweetybirdgirl's response:
Hi Tweety,

I like owls too. A few nights ago, one was in my yard someplace hoo-hooing. It woke me up for some reason, I listened for a bit and then went back to sleep. I have lots of woods around my place, so there are owls and many birds nesting here. Occasionally, I even see an owl in daylight flying around my place.

Hooty
 
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tweetybirdgirl replied to Hootyowl2's response:
Hootyowl,

Unfortunately we dont have many owls in Albuquerque..
You are blessed to be able to have them so close!!
I just love them!!!

Merry CHRISTmas!!!
 
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TanteWaileka replied to Michael Dansinger, MD's response:
Type 2 Diabetes is a scam perpetuated by the AMA and the diabetes groups. Three months ago I was told by a 'doctor' that I had type 2 diabetes. I went on a vegan diet and also low-gglycemic foods. In less than a month I was free of any signs of diabetes and have remained so today. I don't eat white potatoes, but I do eat yams. I tried adding foods to my diet the first month, and if I ate white potatoes my sugars spiked, but not so with yams. So no white potatoes, no meat, no milk, no fish, no eggs, etc. My bloodsugar is well within the normal range ALL the time. So who cares what you think, you are a DOCTOR, so inculcated into a 'managing' perspective, not a removing perspective. Luckily, after much searching, I found a holistic medicine doctor who is monitoring me and I am fine... my mother got rid of diabetes the same exact way at 82 (and SHE had been on twice-a-day injections at the time!) She is now 93 and no trace of diabetes since 82.
 
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auriga1 replied to TanteWaileka's response:
We are all entitled to our opinions; they are just opinions, not fact.

Respect and courtesy go a long way when trying to impress upon others your opinion.
 
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DavidHueben replied to TanteWaileka's response:
As Auriga said, respect and courtesy go a long way. Personally, I do care about Dr. Dansinger's thoughts. Have you bothered to read any of his postings or his other comments? I don't incorporate all of his thoughts into how I manage my Type II, but I also don't sink to the level of being insulting to him either

You are certainly entitled to your opinions, but maybe it is you who has been "
inculcated" into thinking just one way.

From a personal point of view, I was diagnosed with Type II diabetes in June of 2005. I still eat meat, fish, poultry, potatoes, eggs, pasta, etc. I haven't had an A1C above 6.0% since then. My last one was 4.9%.

Maybe there are multiple approaches to dealing with this condition. Something to consider.

David
We sleep soundly in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm.

- Winston S. Churchill




 
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betaquartz replied to TanteWaileka's response:
It is obvious that this scam has affected the way you do things.
. . if I ate white potatoes my sugars spiked, and how did you know that? Must be you tested your BG. I went on a vegan diet and also low-gglycemic foods. In less than a month I was free of any signs of diabetes means you made dietary changes to fight the scam. So no white potatoes, no meat, no milk, no fish, no eggs, etc. . . further proof of your dietary changes. Now the part about . . So who cares what you think, you are a DOCTOR, so inculcated into a 'managing' perspective, not a removing perspective. . . Dr. D is a respected physician crying fowl against the mainstream of medical thinking. For that many of us here are lucky. Attacks by someone who obviously has some sort of axe to grind are not warranted. I hope you are able to overcome your issues before they overcome you.
 
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brunosbud replied to Michael Dansinger, MD's response:
Dr. Dansinger,

Thank you for your participation in this forum. I've learned much from your articles and posts, particularly, the ones on Reversing Diabetes...

Now, if you and your colleagues can find a way to reverse rude and inappropriate behavior, you'll really have my attention...
 
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SugarplumButtercup replied to DavidHueben's response:
Thank you for your post, David, and thank God for the rough men standing ready.

I am interested in your personal guidelines that have brought you to the 4.9 A1C. Do you focus on getting a certain amount of exercise, stay away from certain foods a certain number of hours before bedtime, be sure to take certain supplements that help regulate blood sugar, or have some other "tricks" that keep you in a healthy blood sugar?

My Type II was diagnosed about the same time as yours, and I am just now finding ways to keep it in the low 6's. I would like to have it in the 5's. Any tips are appreciated.
 
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DianeR01 replied to brunosbud's response:
Like
accelerate out of the corners


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