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    Oh great I MADE A MISTAKE
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    jasononsweets posted:
    Went out last night and had a spahetti dinner folowed by 2 donuts... my BS has been about 110 in the morning but today it hit 176... and I am off Onglyza as of yesterday and just on Lantus and Glucovance. This was stupid but hopefully it will go back down. Should I stop eating until it does. What usually happens after a food binge? Does it go back down or stay high?
    Reply
     
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    betaquartz responded:
    OUch! No don't skip meals, but spaghetti dinner and donuts-give us a break, that isn't a mistake-thats a melt down! Lets face it if you are a PWD you need to be more selective in your food choices, and not be indulgent and then hope to cover it with meds, or making another big mistake like not eating.
     
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    DavidHueben responded:
    Quit eating donuts. This is at least the second time you have mentioned donuts.
    We sleep soundly in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm.

    - Winston S. Churchill




     
    avatar
    mhall6252 responded:
    Most people will have a dietary indiscretion from time to time. We're human, after all. The best thing to do is get right back on the right eating plan and you will likely find your glucose levels normalize. A little extra exercise after an indulgence can help the body process the glucose more quickly.

    I'm not suggesting this is a good thing. But the reality is that most of us will indulge from time to time. Just don't make a habit of it.
    Michelle
    Diabetic since 5/2001
    Follow my journey at www.mch-breastcancer.blogspot.com
    Smile and the world smiles with you.
     
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    auriga1 responded:
    "What usually happens after a food binge?" Your sugar goes up especially with the amount of carbs you ate. Can't imagine what your BS was after that meal. Mine would have been close to 700.

    Your BS will go back down. Not as fast as you like because you are not using a rapid-acting insulin. But, it will go down.

    Yes, it was stupid (using your own words.) Despite insulin and medication you can't eat what you want to eat and expect your BS to remain "intact."

    You need to change your thought process regarding the type of foods you select. If you need help in achieving that process, don't be embarassed to ask for it.
     
    avatar
    jasononsweets replied to auriga1's response:
    Stupid is the right word... especially since I wanted to get an accurate reading due to my insurance company (Bravo) denying me my Onglza medicine. I had about 20 carbs for breakfast and lunch and got a reading of 99 but I did take an expired JANUVIA pill in the morning to make up for the Onglyza. Hope I can keep the readings down... the donuts are also a killer but I was counting the plain brown ones as 14 carbs. Might be a mistake...
     
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    laura2gemini2 replied to jasononsweets's response:
    In regards to your insurance denying your onglyza, did your pharmacy say it needed a prior authorization or did it say it flat out doesnt pay for it? Most of the time the company where you buy insurance from, usually your place of employment, sets limits on some medications if there are lower cost alternatives available.

    Basically a prior authorization is a set of questions set up by the insurance that the dr needs to answer. More than likely it will ask if you have used a "preferred" medication or if you have had intolerance to that med (or if intolerance is suspected).

    In your instance if you dont know for sure, call your PBM (pharmacy benefit manager) and ask if it needs a prior auth and if it does you can start one. If the medication is not covered at all, ask for the appeal information for your plan. They will give you an address where you can have your doctor mail clinical information about why you need to take onglyza.

    Another option is you can ask the pharmacist if there are alternatives to the onglyza, and talk to your doctor if any of those are right for you.
     
    avatar
    jasononsweets replied to Anon_527's response:
    The drug required step therapy which my doctor faxed rhem the previous 4 ineffective drugs but it was still denied. I told him to fax them again... I need the medicine... my count this morning was 133 and I am not happy with that count since I am also on insulin. When I took the Onglyza it was always lower. I know it is an expensive drug but I am sure the insurance companies get a break.
     
    avatar
    flutetooter replied to jasononsweets's response:
    Not eating donuts is much cheaper than Onglyza and doesn't require step therapy.
    If at first you don't succeed, try, try again!


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