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Am I really diabetic
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jaayers posted:
I have just been told that I am diabetic my sugar level after fasting for 8 hours was 127 a glucose test was also done and it was 155,on the same day they tested my blood sugar again and it was 93 . What had me amazed is that I am a health conscious person who watches everything that I eat,I exercise three to four times a week, I walk to and from work on a daily basis, my family members as far as I know is not diabetic. I believe that my doctor misdiagnosed me.but I will be going to have a second opinion done.I just 'don't want to be taking medication for something I am not sure I have.
jaayers
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dianer01 responded:
Hi Jaayers:

I know you believe you were misdiagnosed but you may want to begin to eat like you are diabetic which may be sufficient to keep you off of medication or possibly reduce the amount of medication you need if you were not misdiagnose.

The simplest of first steps would be to give up any soda, cookies, chips, candy, pastries and other simple carbs such as white rice, pasta and bread.

Between now and your second opinion, you may also want to keep a food diary showing portion size of what you have eaten and when along with any exercise. Do you have a meter? If so, a fasting blood glucose and testing 2 hours after your major meals may help your medical team give you guidance.

I strongly suggest you read Dr Dansingers blog about reversing diabetes. If you currently watch what you eat, you may only need to make some simple changes to your diet.

my best to you.
accelerate out of the corners
 
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brunosbud responded:
jaayers,

Here were a few statistics mentioned in the recent HBO series, "The Weight of the Nation".

  • "A Child born in 2000 has a 1 in 3 lifetime chance of having diabetes...If that child is African American or Latino, its 1 in 2."
  • "13% of all children who die, in autopsy studies, have non-alcholic fatty liver disease...this is a disease we've never seen, before. It didn't exist, before...and, now 38% of obese children have it!"
  • "In 1940 the occurrence of diabetes among Native Americans was almost unknown. Diabetes began appearing in 1950, until during the 1960s, it became a common condition. The incidence of diabetes exploded in the 1970s, becoming an epidemic. Presently, in the 1990s, nearly every Native American is involved either personally with diabetes, or with family and friends with diabetes.".



Most on this board will refute the existence of a Type 2 Diabetes "spectrum". They would also argue that 6.7 is the diagnosis for diabetes.

That's cool. They can believe whatever they want...

But, when it is more than evident that as people age in America, A1C is moving in only one direction, in my book, that's a "spectrum".

Point is this, jaayers. Regardless of the "diagnosis", why not "Act as if...?"


Note: Most recent A1C just two weeks ago: 5.2, % bodyfat: 18%, I eat no restaurant food of any kind, little red meat, I eat a salad before every meal (including breakfast) walk a minimum of 6 miles, everyday, for the last 5 years & three close family members have died from complications related to T2D...
 
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betatoo responded:
I just 'don't want to be taking medication for something I am not sure I have.

So take a giant step right now, cut back on the white starches and sugars, and cut way back on the whole grain carbs. Just for a month, and see what happens. Get another A1C and FBG test to check on your progress.
 
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Michael Dansinger, MD responded:
Dear jaayers,
Thank you for your important post. I agree with you that you need to know exactly what your diabetes status is, in order for you to make informed decisions.

Criteria for type 2 diabetes is fasting glucose of 126 mg/dL with a confirmation test to exclude lab error, or a hemoglobin A1c level of 6.5% or higher (A1c 5.7% to 6.4% is considered "increased risk" and I prefer to call it prediabetes). It would make sense to get an A1c test and another fasting glucose level. I think it is very likely that you have type 2 diabetes or prediabetes and the A1c test is very important at this stage. Not just for diagnosis, but to help you measure your improvement over time.

Even if you don't have diabetes or prediabetes, I recommend acting "as if". In my view, we should all be leading the kind of lifestyle designed to reverse, minimize, or avoid type 2 diabetes. I do.

Michael Dansinger, MD
 
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SabOkeke replied to Michael Dansinger, MD's response:
Doctor Dansinger, what are safe meals for Diebetics? How safe is Wheat Flour, Wheat Bread, etc
 
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mikeh73 responded:
jaayers,

I agree with the others. You made a comment about having to take medication. Depending on where your numbers fall with the re-tests, maybe you won't. My story is similar.

When I was first diagnosed back in March, I went through denial because I had been through a stressful 18 months due to family and job issues, and put on 20 lbs during that period by stress eating some really bad foods (soda, candy, cookies,etc etc) and I had stopped exercising. Being that I was already 30 lbs overweight when it happened (I am 6'4" and went from 235 to 255 lbs), I can see why I got the Type-2 diagnosis now. I had a morning fast of 129 and A1C of 7.0. My doctor wanted to put me on 3 medications (Glumetsa 2 others for Glumeza side effects) and I said "no", that I would make the changes and get myself out of the mess I got myself into. In less than 6 weeks, as the result of diet and exercise, I had lost15 lbs and had already lowered my A1C to 5.6 and was getting morning fast readings in the low 90s. My doctor actually stated that I had "saved my life" and that's is the truth. I have now lost 43 pounds (7-10 more to go) and my A1C is down to 5.4 now with morning fast readings in the 85-93 range. This weekend I will attain Dr. Dansinger's definition of "remission", 60 days since the 5.6 A1C without ever taking medication, and I feel great with no intent of ever going back to my previous lifestyle. Diagnosis or not, forget about that, it's what you do starting now that counts. Make the changes, maintain the commitment, and you'll be amazed at what happens and how you good feel about yourself. The part I enjoy the most is going out to buy smaller size clothes. It's like winning a prize almost. It's a challenge, but you have to take the first step, but it's definitely worth it !!

I wish you good luck. I hope it turns out OK for you.
 
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moonwalke responded:
hi my name is tracey hgba1c was 6.7 right now im try to manage withou my meds under my doc care for three month how do feel about that ? should i be afraid ?
 
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flutetooter replied to moonwalke's response:
Tracy, your post is very confusing to me. Why are you trying to manage without your meds? Does you doctor know you are not taking your meds? What meds were you on? Have you been diagnosed by your doctor as a diabetic? Why do you feel that you should be afraid? A person with your A1c can probably do very well by eating carefully, exercising, and following the doctors orders.
If at first you don't succeed, try, try again!
 
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mikeh73 replied to moonwalke's response:
Dear Moonwalke,

I would keep an eye on your readings and inform your doctor if something doesn't look right. My doctor gave me the same 90 days to see if I could bring my fasting BG and A1C down, and I was successful. Don't be afraid, be positiive !! The end result of my doctor's initial OK for a 90 day diet and exercise regimen eventually resulted in a 55 lb weight loss to 199 from 254 lb in Feb, a BMI of 24.3, and fasting BGs consistently now in the mid 80s and an A1C of 5.1 last week. That's a reduction of about 35% in 4 months. Go for it. If it doesn't work your doctor will get you on the correct treatment.


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