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ssh49tn posted:
I have type 2, & take 500 mg of metformin daily. My question is, today I had a very busy day, took my meds early this afternoon, (overslept), then had errands to run, & forgot to eat anything. By the time I got back home, I was starting to get a little shaky, but not too bad, so I hurried & fixed some supper, (taco salad), & unwound for a while. However, I noticed that I had a shaky feeling inside me for some reason. I had drunk a small Sunny D earlier, plus had eaten a small sweet roll. (I know, NOT a good thing to eat!) But, was doing laundry so just kept going. Finally, about 20 min. ago, I checked my level, & it was 78. So I'm wondering if I had gotten too low earlier, or if I need to keep my levels a bit higher. My dr told me to not go below 70, or above 160, which I rarely get that high, just once in a while. And, it rarely gets too low, but for me to be shaky like this, I'm wondering if something else may be going on, or if anyone has had this happen to them, & what they did about it. I don't like to eat a lot of sweets, unless I do get too low.
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flutetooter responded:
For all of us, our blood sugar control process actually goes meal by meal and hour by hour. It depends on what we eat and when, how much medications we take and when, and how much exercise we get and when. One pill a day or one meal a day will not keep the whole day in control. It is better for your body to eat lower carbohydrates, lean proteins, and good fats at regular - predictable intervals throughout the day.

I think you know that but are still wondering why a big sugar blast like Sunny D and a sweet roll (of ANY size) would affect you. What happens is that your body over-reacts to all that sugar and produces a glut of insulin, which then brings about a low - just the same as if a type 1 would inject too much insulin.

You are fortunate just to need the minimal dosage of Metformin. If you plan your meal to be healthy all the time, you will probably go many years without needing additional meds, or possibly wean yourself off the Metformin with your doctor's consent.

If you eat a lot of sugary things and don't eat good food regularly, the opposite thing will happen. You will cause your body to over-secret insulin, thereby burning up your remaining beta cells in the pancreas, and have to be on ever increasing amounts of diabetes medications and then insulin shots. Keep checking out posts here to see how other diabetics handle things. Welcome
If at first you don't succeed, try, try again!
 
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ssh49tn replied to flutetooter's response:
Ok, I understand that! Unfortunately, I don't have any insurance, & my doctor hasn't been too informative on the diabetes thing. She basically just check my sugar whenever I felt like it, so most days I have no idea if it's up or down. I DO know when it's getting to that bad point of being too low, so can counteract it real quick. I try to not over do the carbs OR the sweets, which the carbs actually have a bigger effect on me than the sugary stuff. Plus, I also have high cholesterol, so have to watch my fat contents too. Now that I'm no longer working, but just once in a great while, I don't snack like I did at work, which has helped me a lot, I've actually managed to lose 12 lbs. It's just that there are things that go on with diabetes that I have no clue of what it is, or why it is, or what to do about it. For instance, once I hit 186, so called the dr to see if I needed to take more metformin, (i was only taking 250 mgs at the time), & the only answer they gave me was to just keep watching what I ate, & take my med as prescribed. Nothing about how to get it back down, just to wait it out, or what. That's why I like sites like this, I can get answers to a lot of my questions from other people who have been through what I'm going through. They need a 'hotline' page to be able to ask questions & get replies right away!
 
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betatoo replied to ssh49tn's response:
I can only reply to your problem with advice from my own experience and lots of reading. First, my dr. told me to remove all white starches from my diet, which I did. Second, really cut back on the brown and orange starches-1/2 cup. Third, triple your leafy and other green veggies as much as you can-eat lots of colors in veggies. Fourth drink at least 8 glasses of water per day-drop all sodas and sugared drinks. Fifth get 30 minutes of exercise 5 days a week-exercise can be paddling, biking cleaning house, walking, etc. If you are without insurance, you had better make major life style changes to make certain you stay healthy. Lose the weight, develop muscle eat healthy, and enjoy. One final thing, these steps have allowed me to stay medication free. It may not do that for all of us, but did for me.
 
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ssh49tn replied to betatoo's response:
My eating right isn't too much of a problem, 'cause I usually watch pretty close. Right now though, I'm having a problem with it dropping real low, (57 this last time), then I drank a small bottle of Sunny Delight, & ate a bowl of macaroni & cheese, & was still shaky, so ate a Little Debbie Nutty bar. I checked my level in an hour, & it was only up to 109. I just had the same type of problem, only this time it was 53, & I drank some orange juice, & ate a small bowl of macaroni & cheese. I have to check my level again in about 15 more minutes, & see what it is. I already can tell that it's better, because that real shaky feeling is almost gone. I'm wondering if I may need a different med than the metformin. I go to see my dr tomorrow so am going to ask her, & see what she thinks.
 
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flutetooter replied to ssh49tn's response:
Every time you eat a bunch of sugary stuff, your pancreas send out a glut of insulin to counteract it. It probably sends too much insulin into your system and burns up too much blood sugar. You are OVER compensating also with your high sugars when it goes low and are sending you body on a rollercoaster ride. If it feels low, try 1/2 small apple with some natural (no sugaradded) peanut butter. Go back and read my first reply again and then begin reading Dr. Michael Dansinger's expert discussions - at the top right of this page. Also put Blood Sugar 101 into your Google slot. Eat more non starchy veggies, and stay away from fruit juices, macaroni, and sweet rools.

I don't think you understand at all that your body is not able to process all that sugar and you need to stay away from it---not just eat junk and take more medications!
If at first you don't succeed, try, try again!
 
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ssh49tn replied to flutetooter's response:
I went to my doctor yesterday, & told her about it going too low. Sat. night it went down to 57, then Tues. night to 53. She said to cut my metformin down to 250 mg, instead of the 500 mg, & to be sure to eat 4 or 5 times a day. Then last night, I got real shaky again, so checked my sugar, & it was 158. I'm thinking the metformin isn't doing what it's supposed to. And, neither is she, so we're going to try the lesser dose, plus eating small meals, but more frequently, & see how that does. If it doesn't help, then I'll discuss other options with her. And, usually the only time I eat anything real sweet is if, my sugar has dropped. I can tell if it's dropped, because my tummy feels like it's melting down into my legs. LOL!!
 
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auriga1 replied to ssh49tn's response:
One thing I wanted to say is that when you go low, you are supposed to only take in 15 grams of carbs. If you take too much in, you are going to go high and then go low. How many carbs in that Sunny D you ingested? And then the macaroni and cheese? Probably more than most of us eat at one meal. 1/3 cup of macaroni noodles has 15 grams of carbs. It would be wise to measure your foods carefully, so you can count your carbs accurately. It's hard to eye how many noodles you put into that bowl without measuring it. This is where you might get yourself into trouble. Plus, pasta, usually made from white flour, is a simple carb, and it will raise your sugar faster than a complex carb.

As Flute said earlier, you are taking too much in carb wise and then your sugar rises dramatically. Then it's going to fall especially since you drank and ate simple carbs.

Try and incorporate more complex carbs into your diet along with eating smaller and more frequent meals. It might help you to maintain a steady blood sugar level without going up and down dramatically.

Metformin does not generally cause one's blood sugar to drop. It's not that type of medicine. It helps your skeletal muscles utilize the blood glucose in your system in a more efficient manner.

Good luck to you.
 
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ssh49tn replied to auriga1's response:
You are very helpful! Thank you! Like I said, I'm learning as I go, & if not for sites like this one, would be totally in the dark. One thing that I do tend to do is, skip eating for too long sometimes, & of course the sugar drops low then, & when I eat something to get it back up, then it can go too high. My big problem is that most of the meals like Lean Cuisine, or Healthy Choice, although low in calories & fat, (I have high cholesterol too), are very high in carbs, because almost every one of them contains either rice, or pasta of some type. And, a lot of the lower carb, or sugar free foods are loaded with fats. And, what you said about the 15 grams of carbs for a sugar low, that's new to me. That's what I keep saying about being diabetic, without insurance, I can't afford to go to a regular diabetic doctor, who can educate me. But, as long as I can pick people's brains on here, & another diabetic site I belong to, I am slowly learning some things! And, my doctor DID tell me that metformin doesn't lower your sugar, just makes your system use the insulin you produce more efficiently. I'm learning!! Thanks to all of you who have replied to me!


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