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Can I stop the meds?
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vasbyt posted:
My BSL have stayed really low for ages. I stopped the insulin and things are good. My BSL is still low and I'd like to stop the Diamicron, as I get hypos.
Will it be alright if I stop?
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davedsel responded:
Any changes to prescription medication must be discussed with your doctor.
Click on my username or avatar picture to read my story.

Blessings,

-Dave
 
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betatoo responded:
As Dave said, talk to your dr. Sudden changes probably aren't a good idea. I argued my way out of metformin on diagnosis. dr gave me 3 months, I told him no, only one as that was what he was giving me on the metformin. that next month my tests won the argument, and have ever since. Remember though that I argued my way out of taking meds, not just dropped them. my dr. opinion comes first.
 
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vasbyt replied to davedsel's response:
Thank you Dave.
I'll do as you say!
 
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vasbyt replied to betatoo's response:
Betatoo, thanks for your reply.
You've both won me over.
Yes, you're right. I'll ask my doctor.

I stopped the insulin (without asking) about 6 months ago.
But I will do what both of you tell me to.

xxx
 
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betatoo replied to vasbyt's response:
Good decision, and better yet. . . you mad it on your own.
 
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vasbyt replied to betatoo's response:
bet, you're so sweet. Thanks again.
xxx
 
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betatoo replied to vasbyt's response:
"""PSaw""""blushiingly. . .
 
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davedsel replied to vasbyt's response:
Just remember that the most important opinion regarding your health care is your doctor's. The members of this WebMD Diabetes Community may have great knowledge through research and personal experience, but most of us are just lay people trying to get and remain healthy. Always go by what your doctor says first. He/she is familiar with your medical history and knows what is best for you.
Click on my username or avatar picture to read my story.

Blessings,

-Dave
 
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brunosbud replied to betatoo's response:
good one hahaha. go eat some nuts.
 
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anon43 replied to brunosbud's response:
i
 
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anon43 replied to davedsel's response:
I would say rather, that if your doctor has advice that you do not agree with and his advice does not bring you improved health maybe you should seek a second opinion. Doctors are not omniscient. But Betatoo points out that it is perfectly all right to disagree with your doctor, argue with him and get him to allow you some latitude.

dolores
 
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davedsel replied to anon43's response:
I totally agree with what you are saying. We do need to be proactive with our health care and gain as much knowledge as possible about our conditions. Doctors do not know everything, but most of them do know more that we do as lay people. I am all for changing doctors if it becomes necessary as I have done that a few times in my lifetime as well.

What I am simply trying to emphasize is the importance of a doctor's advice over just relying on members of an internet forum.
Click on my username or avatar picture to read my story.

Blessings,

-Dave
 
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betatoo replied to davedsel's response:
Beg to differ with you. Dr.s know the standard treatments for disease as supported by select organizations. these organizations are supported in part by the medicinal industry or at least heavily lobbied by them. So when you get an organization that stresses a diet that does not limit starches and concentrated carbohydrates such as the ADA before 2010, you get a number to drs and their dieticians that subscribe to those diets. Now if they have not kept up to date with the newer research into low carb diets, then they are not able to make reasonable assumptions about the best for your health.
My dr finds that he is learning more every day, by being my dr. I will never be a knowledgeable generalist that can assume responsibility for others. I know what works for ME. Some of what I believe may work for others, but I think you also have to go down the same road as I to reach those conclusions, with your dr. of course.
 
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brunosbud replied to betatoo's response:
Beg to differ with you...slightly.

The average time your physician or specialist has to review your condition, go over test results, answer questions, then, summarize a treatment plan, write prescriptions and order more tests...15 minutes. Therefore, the patient-doctor appointment is arguably the most pressurized, mentally demanding, concentrated form of information exchange most people will ever experience in their lives.

So, how do the majority of people prepare to see their doctor? They roll off the couch 10 minutes before their appointment, stop off at Starbucks for latte grande with extra sugar and arrive 20 minutes late...in their PJs and robe. It's not that doctors can't help you; "You" can't help you!

Yeah, great advice!...Go see the doctor! The day is saved!


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