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    What are normal blood sugar levels in teenagers?
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    Runnerxc96 posted:
    I'm 17 years old, I'm not overweight but my dad has diabetes. We tested my blood sugar this morning after not eating for about 12 hours and having gone on a run, and it was 133. Is this too high? About a week ago, I got really lightheaded and short of breath so we tested it (about 2 hours after eating) and it was 94. Can anyone tell me what this might mean?
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    Runnerxc96 responded:
    Also, not sure if it makes a difference but I do drink water and pee A LOT and I'm tired a lot but I don't seem to have any of the other symptoms that I've read about.
     
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    brunosbud responded:
    The key phrase, here, "gone on a run". Sure, you fasted for 12 hours, but by going on that run, you're telling your body, "OK, there's no food in my stomach so, 'liver', can you please dump some glucose into my blood stream so my muscles can absorb it and convert it to energy so I don't fall flat on my face." What you should have done it you want to get a true fasting glucose reading is measure before the run.

    I've been working out at 4:30AM for many years. Whenever I test my blood sugar before that early morning workout, it's not uncommon for me to get fasting blood glucose reads as high as 135. In my mind, there's a simple explanation. My body is prepping for the approaching sugar demands during the early morning hours while I sleep. Thus, when the alarm rings at 4:15, I'm wide awake and ready to roll. Most diabetics, here, would freak with fasting numbers like mine. But, my A1C has never been higher than 5.5 for the last 4 years. I've taken several thousand measurements to learn how my body behaves. This is a perfect example of blood sugar measurements discussed without "context". Inexperienced diabetics freak from a single given reading. But, experienced diabetics who understand the relationship between diet, exercise, sleep and, most importantly, ROUTINE, can pretty much predict what their glucometer will say.

    Impossible to comment on the "lightheadedness". You provide zero context. Best advice is to see a physician, get a complete physical and work-up so he/she can get a complete picture of your situation.


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