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Diet, Metformin Cut Medical Cost for Prediabetes Patients
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Haylen_WebMD_Staff posted:
People with prediabetes can save thousands of dollars in medical costs by taking the diabetes drug metformin or making lifestyle changes, a new study shows.

Click link for the whole article - Haylen
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nwsmom responded:
My answer is a qualified "yes", if the study results get to the right people and they follow the suggestions! Thanks, Haylen.

Nancy
 
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betaquartz responded:
Interesting to note that even though the drug made the main header, diet and exercise had better results and higher score in quality of life.
 
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arealgijoe replied to betaquartz's response:
Right on BetaQ.......... So much advertising these days is down right MISS-leading! I doubt there would have been any SIGNIFICANT differance in final results in that study if the drug was totally left out of the study. So much of society today is driven by $$$, not principles.

I bet the study would have had great results with only LIFESTYLE (diet/exercise) changes.... oops that would not help DRUG $ale$.

Gomer
 
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DavidHueben responded:
Metformin is an inexpensive, generally well-tolerated, and effective medication in treating Type II diabetics with a history of insulin resistance.

A ninety day supply costs about $4.00 or about 4.4 cents per day for me. I doubt anyone is making huge profits from this generic medication.

Maybe I missed something, but I have never seen any TV, print, or Internet advertising for this generic medication. The manufacturers do not offer "free" steak dinners, provide perks to prescribing physicians, or appear at diabetes conferences for CDE's, physicians, or consumers.

Taking Metformin does not preclude the inclusion of better dietary habits and/or more physical activity. In fact, just the opposite. As my doctor told me, taking this small dosage of Metformin is not a license to eat anything. It is an adjunct therapy meant to complement lifestyle changes.

I have done all three (to the best of my ability with some medical restrictions) and it has been effective for me.

DMH
We sleep soundly in our beds because rough men stand ready in the night to visit violence on those who would do us harm. - Winston S. Churchill
 
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laura2gemini2 responded:
I feel that this study would definitely help those who are newly diagnosed who feel that they need a pill to "fix everything". I come in contact with those types of people every day. You mention lifestyle changes and they balk, saying that its too hard and that they would rather just pop a pill. Metformin may be a happy medium getting the person stabilized while trying to influence small changes to start.

That, and I'm also biased. Too many people around me who are newly diagnosed are doing nothing to help themselves, expecting a magic pill to solve everything. One woman I work with was going on about how she would be the "model diabetic" and even asked me for advise. I gave her some tips (and Dr. Dansinger's blog). 2 days later we had an office party and she ended up having cake, ice cream, cheese cake, and the icing I scraped off my small piece of cake. I could do nothing but sit and gape. Still, I would rather her start on the metformin and hope that one day soon she'll get the picture, rather than nothing at all.


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