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High stroke risk in vegans
 
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jc3737 responded:
http://jcem.endojournals.org/content/90/11/5937.full

We need to investigate further.I have read this problem goes away when keeping to a low sodium diet,and keeping blood pressure under control.
 
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jc3737 replied to jc3737's response:
"Amino acids modulate the secretion of both insulin and glucagon; the composition of dietary protein therefore has the potential to influence the balance of glucagon and insulin activity. Soy protein, as well as many other vegan proteins, are higher in non-essential amino acids than most animal-derived food proteins, and as a result should preferentially favor glucagon production. Acting on hepatocytes, glucagon promotes (and insulin inhibits) cAMP-dependent mechanisms that down-regulate lipogenic enzymes and cholesterol synthesis, while up-regulating hepatic LDL receptors and production of the IGF-I antagonist IGFBP-1. The insulin-sensitizing properties of many vegan diets--high in fiber, low in saturated fat--should amplify these effects by down-regulating insulin secretion. Additionally, the relatively low essential amino acid content of some vegan diets may decrease hepatic IGF-I synthesis. Thus, diets featuring vegan proteins can be expected to lower elevated serum lipid levels, promote weight loss, and decrease circulating IGF-I activity. The latter effect should impede cancer induction (as is seen in animal studies with soy protein), lessen neutrophil-mediated inflammatory damage, and slow growth and maturation in children. In fact, vegans tend to have low serum lipids, lean physiques, shorter stature, later puberty, and decreased risk for certain prominent 'Western' cancers; a vegan diet has documented clinical efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis. Low-fat vegan diets may be especially protective in regard to cancers linked to insulin resistance--namely, breast and colon cancer--as well as prostate cancer; conversely, the high IGF-I activity associated with heavy ingestion of animal products may be largely responsible for the epidemic of 'Western' cancers in wealthy societies. Increased phytochemical intake is also likely to contribute to the reduction of cancer risk in vegans. Regression of coronary stenoses has been documented during low-fat vegan diets coupled with exercise training; such regimens also tend to markedly improve diabetic control and lower elevated blood pressure. Risk of many other degenerative disorders may be decreased in vegans, although reduced growth factor activity may be responsible for an increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke. By altering the glucagon/insulin balance, it is conceivable that supplemental intakes of key non-essential amino acids could enable omnivores to enjoy some of the health advantages of a vegan diet. An unnecessarily high intake of essential amino acids--either in the absolute sense or relative to total dietary protein--may prove to be as grave a risk factor for 'Western' degenerative diseases as is excessive fat intake. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10687887
 
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DoloresTeresa replied to jc3737's response:
The western diet causes people to have ischemic strokes and the Asian or plant based diet causes people to have hemorrhagic strokes. I am forced to take meds which supposedly prevent the stent from restenosing and prevent the heart from remodeling among other things but which can give me cataracts, raise my blood sugar and deplete co q 10, not to mention slowing down circulation with all the problems that will entail. So for every article on the evils of a high fat diet, I guess we can find an article on the evils of a low fat diet. And I wouldn't think of vacationing in Vegas.

Dolores PS The Japanese smoke like chimneys and use lots and lots of salt. I do not know about the Chinese. If Campbell did not discuss the high stroke rates among the Chinese he studied and the information was readily available then he was indeed remiss.
 
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jc3737 replied to DoloresTeresa's response:
Heretic posted that low IGF is a problem with vegan diets becasue it is linked to an increase in strokes but it is also linked to less cancer.

"Thus, diets featuring vegan proteins can be expected to lower elevated serum lipid levels, promote weight loss, and decrease circulating IGF-I activity. The latter effect should impede cancer induction (as is seen in animal studies with soy protein), lessen neutrophil-mediated inflammatory damage, and slow growth and maturation in children. In fact, vegans tend to have low serum lipids, lean physiques, shorter stature, later puberty, and decreased risk for certain prominent 'Western' cancers; a vegan diet has documented clinical efficacy in rheumatoid arthritis. Low-fat vegan diets may be especially protective in regard to cancers linked to insulin resistance--namely, breast and colon cancer--as well as prostate cancer; conversely, the high IGF-I activity associated with heavy ingestion of animal products may be largely responsible for the epidemic of 'Western' "
 
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heretk replied to DoloresTeresa's response:
Not only T.C. Campbell forgot to discuss that, he also forgot to mention that meat and fish did NOT correlate with the heart disease. He also forgot to mention that wheat consumption did, more so than any other dietary factor!
 
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jc3737 replied to heretk's response:
I'm not so sure about the wheat/meat correlations.This explains why the data is so often misued to make the case that fish and meat do not correlate with heart disease when they actually do......according to Dr Campbell.

http://www.vegsource.com/news/2010/07/china-study-author-colin-campbell-slaps-down-critic-denise-minger.html
 
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DoloresTeresa replied to heretk's response:
H, I read the China Study and I seem to remember that Campbell specifically said that meat does correlate with heart disease and said the curve plotted was practically a straight line. Oddly enough he also said that the amount of fat did not correlate in a straight line curve and that the amounts of fat vs heart disease was all over the place. There was an asterisk when he mentioned fish so I do not know what this means--did it mean that fish does not cause heart disease or that it wasn't counted in the animal protein numbers.

Also, in his reply to Denise Minger, he does discuss wheat and says that you would have to adjust for ( I don't know if I got that right) the possibility among wheat eaters of lower green vegetable consumption, lower serum levels of monounsaturated fats, high serum levels of urea denoting high protein consumption, greater body weight. all of which are variables confounding the wheat correlation.

You can look at this. I have no idea if he is correct or not.

Also, Campbell observed the higher rate of liver cancer among children from well to do families and his research with casein was not original but an attempt to replicate a journal article from a study done in India.

Dolores


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