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jc3737 posted:
Legumes and meat analogues consumption are associated with hip fracture risk independently of meat intake among Caucasian men and women: the Adventist Health Study-2. Lousuebsakul-Matthews V , Thorpe DL , Knutsen R , Beeson WL , Fraser GE , Knutsen SF . Author information
  • 1 Department of Health Services, Los Angeles County, CA, USA.
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: In contrast to non-vegetarians, vegetarians consume more legumes and meat analogues as sources of protein to substitute for meat intake. The present study aimed to assess the association between foods with high protein content (legumes, meat, meat analogues) by dietary pattern (vegetarians, non-vegetarians) and hip fracture incidence, adjusted for selected lifestyle factors.
DESIGN: A prospective cohort of Adventist Health Study-2 (AHS-2) enrollees who completed a comprehensive lifestyle and dietary questionnaire between 2002 and 2007.
SETTING: Every two years after enrolment, a short questionnaire on hospitalizations and selected disease outcomes including hip fractures was sent to these members.
SUBJECTS: Respondents (n 33 208) to a baseline and a follow-up questionnaire.
RESULTS: In a multivariable model, legumes intake of once daily or more reduced the risk of hip fracture by 64 % (hazard ratio = 0·36, 95 % CI 0·21, 0·61) compared with those with legumes intake of less than once weekly. Similarly, meat intake of four or more times weekly was associated with a 40 % reduced risk of hip fracture (hazard ratio = 0·60, 95 % CI 0·41, 0·87) compared with those whose meat intake was less than once weekly. Furthermore, consumption of meat analogues once daily or more was associated with a 49 % reduced risk of hip fracture (hazard ratio = 0·51, 95 % CI 0·27, 0·98) compared with an intake of less than once weekly.
CONCLUSIONS: Hip fracture incidence was inversely associated with legumes intake and, to a lesser extent, meat intake, after accounting for other food groups and important covariates. Similarly, a high intake of meat analogues was associated with a significantly reduced risk of hip fracture.
PMID: 24103482 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher>
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jc3737 responded:
I thought meat was bad for bones?



"Similarly, meat intake of four or more times weekly was associated with a 40 % reduced risk of hip fracture (hazard ratio = 0?60, 95 % CI 0?41, 0?87) compared with those whose meat intake was less than once weekly. Furthermore, consumption of meat analogues once daily or more was associated with a 49 % reduced risk of hip fracture (hazard ratio = 0?51, 95 % CI 0?27, 0?98) compared with an intake of less than once weekly"
 
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max9821 replied to jc3737's response:
A useless report unless we know what the actual diet was of the participants. Eating less meat could mean someone is an ethical vegan who eats potato chips and drinks coke.

dolores
 
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jc3737 replied to max9821's response:
I disagree....I don't think the study can be dismissed that easily.Eating more meat should(if we believe the acid theory)have created more acidity which required the bones to neutralize the acid.On a person by person basis knowing the exact diet would be helpful but when dealing with stats the "bad" vegans get averaged in with the "good" vegans and there is no way meat eaters (3-4 times a week)should have had a 40% reduction.....ethical vegans or vegans with a bad diet do not explain away the results.

We have to at least consider that the plant based gurus may exaggerate the benefits of their diet and overkill the dangers of meat.
 
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max9821 replied to jc3737's response:
Yes, the benefits of any diet can be exaggerated. Some whole food plant eaters have reported gerd on that diet but not when eating meat and one person wrote that she had been eating wfpb no fat for ten years and was diagnosed with colon cancer. All any diet you choose does is, hopefully give you a statistically better chance of good health.

I do not think anyone should dismiss the study cited but I do think that a copy of the whole journal article with any charts should be perused so we would know how the study was carried out and how the conclusions were reached. Much as Jeff Novick did with the Mediterranean Diet study whose flaws he pointed out.

dolores


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