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Weight loss and Gain
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wendy5555 posted:
I was doing really well on a diet and lost 40 pounds over the summer. Recently in one week I gained 8 pounds back and don't know why. Nothing has changed. What could be going on?
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BigDaddyMatty responded:
Water retention from an increase in sodium.
 
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wendy5555 replied to BigDaddyMatty's response:
thanks for the idea bigdaddymatty but i am watching my intake of sodium due to high blood pressure. so does anyone have any other ideas? just a side note bigdaddy i really miss eating real corn chips!
 
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brunosbud responded:
Retaining water is usually not a good thing. There can be many causes. If you have not done anything drastically different to cause this occurrence, I would suggest you have this checked out. Medications and salt are not the only reasons this can happen. Inflammation, changes in heart function & blood pressure or early stage kidney or liver disease are also possibilities. Forget about weight loss for the moment and have a physician investigate to be safe.
 
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wendy5555 replied to brunosbud's response:
thank you brunosbud. i am going to make an appointment with the doc tomorrow. i never thought of things like you mentioned. i'm so used to weight loss being a good thing.
 
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Pamela Peeke, MD, MPH, FACP responded:
Hi and thanks so much for your posting Wendy. Here are some thoughts regarding your weight fluctuations.

How did you shed the pounds to start with? What kind of diet?

Were you exercising as well? If so what were you doing?

Have you ever had your thyroid function tested? If so, when and was it normal?

Many people strip almost all carbs from their food consumption and when they resume any carbs, especially breads, water weight piles back on. 4 molecules of water accompany 1 molecule of stored glucose.

Let's hear from you and we'll take it from there.

Dr Peeke
 
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wendy5555 replied to Pamela Peeke, MD, MPH, FACP's response:
hi and i'm glad you took time to ask me some questions.my thyroid checks out fine and i have an appointment with my doctor in two weeks.

i guess i wasn't on a "diet" so much as i just took what i ate before and cut it down to half the amount. it's not so hard to do as i am never hungry. really not at all. sometimes i find myself wondering when i last ate and realize it's been eight hours or more. i filled up any extra time doing things i enjoy and "time gets away from me." i wasn't doing any more exercise than i normally do. as for cutting carbs i always try to eat smarter carbs. i'm diabetic so i am used to managing that.

i hope to find an answer soon. it's sad to lose that much and then gain some back for unknown reasons! i will let you know what's up as soon as i do.
 
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Pamela Peeke, MD, MPH, FACP replied to wendy5555's response:
Hey Wendy. Thanks for getting back to me. Good your thyroid function is normal. I think I know what your problem is. Although I don't have a precise food log from you, I think you're aiming for healthier choices.

I believe your major problem is that you let 8 hours or more go by without eating. The human body is meant to have some form of nutrition roughly every 4 hours. This includes snacks as well as meals. Whenever you eat, you may notice you warm up a bit. That's because you have to use energy to get the energy from food, so you're actually burning calories to retrieve calories. Protein and fiber rich foods burn the most calories. Simple sugars the least. Eating on a more regular schedule allows you to stoke your metabolism and keep it hot. It's like building a fire (metabolic furnace) and then tossing in some fuel here and there to keep it hot.

If you skip meals/snacks, your body cools down. Your metabolism adjusts to what it considers to be a famine state. That's what happens in all warm blooded mammals. if you do this a lot, your appetite and hunger becomes dysregulated and as such, you won't feel normal pangs of hunger or interest in eating. That's actually a survival mechanism so that you can live longer with less food.

Let's try this. To get you back onto a regular schedule, whip out your smart phone and create reminders for your meals and snacks every 4 hours. You don't have to eat a lot of food. But you do have to eat.

Click onto the WebMD Food and Fitness Planner, plug in your data and you'll have a great schedule for eating as well as exercise. it may take a few weeks for your body to adjust to its new routine, but it will be a healthier and more nature way to live and eat.

Meanwhile, please integrate cardio with intensity intervals at least 5 x week and then do some kind of resistance training 2 x week. You see, in addition to eating healthfully regularly, you have to maintain your muscle mass which harbors calorie burning engines in its cells.

Try this and let me know how it goes.

Good luck and please let us know how you're doing.

Dr. Peeke
 
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summer responded:
According to my cardiologist, it is very difficult to lose more than 10% of your body weight and keep it off long term because your body goes into conservation mode and your metabolism slows down drastically to keep yourself from starving to death.

You need to really kick up the cardio to keep it off. It will take about one year for your body to reset and realize that this is your new correct weight. Otherwise you will gain it right back. He doesn't recommend losing more than 25 pounds a year for this reason.

Good luck!
 
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totallywiggedout replied to summer's response:
Bah, jeez if people listened to that they wouldn't even try to lose weight. 10% ?? My gosh , I started out at 253 and have lost a bit over 70 lbs. so far. If you go slowly and learn to work through plateaus and emotional times without overindulging, there's absolutely NOTHING you can't accomplish.
The biggest, most important things to learn are eating proper portions and making sure you are eating to feed your body and not your emotional state.
kim
Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work --- Thomas Edison

What doesn't kill us makes us stronger---Friedrich Nietzche
 
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dejohnson9515 responded:
Summer, fall, winter and spring bring different ambient temperatures and bodily needs. Seasonal changes can affect how your body retains or loses weight. From one who knows,
don't worry about it and good luck.
 
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wendy5555 replied to Pamela Peeke, MD, MPH, FACP's response:
doctor peeke thank you for getting back to me. i went to the doctor the other day after doing my usual testing (my a1c & all the usual tests) & found out i'm fine except i'm anemic. going to work on that by adding more iron-rich foods like spinach.

i know i go (went) too long without eating but the big question is why am i never hungry? my doctor doesn't know so, anyway, i'm following your thought & eating more often. don't want my body to go into it's saving mode anymore! . i usually go for a 30 minute walk every day or on the treadmill. i was thinking about switching from fast pace to normal pace so i'd be changing off every 5 minutes. i remember i read about someone doing this years ago. does this sound like a good plan? my doctor didn't really seem to think about it much. he's just glad i walk!
 
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wendy5555 replied to dejohnson9515's response:
just was reading your comment & now i remember that not only my cat but i also put on weight for winter! evolution is very slow in realizing that we don't need to store our fat for winter! thank you for the thought. wendy


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