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High Cholesterol
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friendly_person3 posted:
Recently being diagnosed with high cholesterol, I failed to ask my doctor how much (if ANY) cholesterol I can include in my diet. I've
turned into a "label reader" and finding that just about everything has
some cholesterol in it.......except for fruits and vegetables! I'm not buying anything that contains cholesterol. Am I doing right - or does
the body need some cholesterol? HELP! I'm hungry!!!
Reply
 
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brunosbud responded:
Establish daily exercise, first. No recovery, no repair can take hold without a consistent pattern of moderate daily movement throughout the day. It's the toughest lifestyle adjustment to incorporate and it's absolutely essential. Start with daily exercise, first.
 
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friendly_person3 responded:
I'm walking every day and doing some indoor exercises. My doctor put me on cholesterol medication but didn't tell me if I'm allowed to eat foods that contain SOME cholesterol. Fruits and vegetables are not satisfying my hunger! I go back to the doctor June 17 and that's a long time to wait for a real meal!
 
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brunosbud replied to friendly_person3's response:
Try not to worry too much about the "food" for now. Relax. There's no need to worry or rush. In fact, the only thing worse than eating french fries is worrying and rushing...

Just, take a walk (even if it's just for a lousy 10 minutes!), everyday.

Many years ago, I couldn't sleep one night, so I took a walk around the neighborhood in the middle of the night. I took my dog with me for company. When we got back, I was exhausted and fell asleep in minutes. That was the night my life changed, for good. From just that one sleepless night, I've walked well over 10,000 miles over the last 5 years. Sadly, not with the same dog but with 2 new ones, now.

The ratio between Total Cholesterol over HDL is the key indicator. The goal is to get that ratio below 4 to 1. Once achieved, your risk of stroke or heart disease becomes miniscule. As your walks progress and gain in distance, your HDL will start to noticeably rise and, transversely, your LDL and triglycerides will fall, too. After a year, or so, you'll finally "get it". It's the everyday focus on ever-increasing movement that's key to lowering cholesterol. Every doctor encourages all their patients to exercise a minimum of 30 minutes/day. And, most overweight patient goes out, joins a gym, brutalizes themselves for 3 or 6 months, then, "quits"...

Relax, take it slow and, most of all, don't worry!...
...and, don't quit!


I'm 56, btw. At 4:30 this morning, "we" got chased by two magnificent, beautiful male coyotes...We got away! My cholesterol ratio is 3.8. Oorah!
 
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friendly_person3 replied to brunosbud's response:
So.....you don't know if a person with high cholesterol is
allowed to eat foods that contain cholesterol? I'm not
worrying, I'd just like to know because I want to do the
right thing!
 
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totallywiggedout replied to friendly_person3's response:
Hi friendly,
A person with high cholesterol is advised to significantly LOWER their consumption of foods that have cholesterol in them.
Does it mean that you have to go without whole eggs? As long as you don't eat WHOLE eggs every day you will be ok.
Instead of making an omlette with , say, 3 eggs, make it with 1 whole egg and 2 egg whites. Use Fat Free cheddar cheese instead of whole fat or even "made with 2% milk" cheese , and load up on the veggies in it, instead of adding high fat meats like bacon or ham, try some precooked chicken or turkey breast(NOT processed lunch meat stuff, use the real thing)
Start to develop a sense of what "heart healthy" really means.
It doesn't mean using NO OILS or NO FATS, it means using the good for you fats and oils.
Extra Virgin Olive Oil, Extra Virgin Coconut Oil, Walnut and Grapeseed Oils are all good for you fats, IN MODERATION, because they still have quite a few calories.
Nuts , THIS DOES NOT INCLUDE PEANUTS, like walnuts, almonds, cashews, hazelnuts, all have good for you fats in them. HEART HEALTHY ones.

Cholesterol is made in your body. It's a necessary part of a healthy body in fact, and it makes enough ON ITS OWN to keep it healthy. The trick is to not ADD too much more with the foods we eat.

Remember that Cholesterol in your arteries acts like plaque on your teeth. It builds up over time if you don't "brush" some of it out, it clogs up.
FIBER is the key to brushing your arteries. That's the reason that Quaker Oatmeal is so gung ho about their cholesterol fighting properties. IT WORKS.
Google foods with HIGH FIBER and start incorporating more and more into your diet.
Reducing your meat consumption to the 4-6 oz serving size makes you feel like you are punishing yourself, fill that extra space with high fiber foods and you won't miss the high fat meat.
Eating more fiber only works if you also INCREASE your WATER consumption. FIBER absorbs that water, bulks up and unclogs arteries even better. If you eat alot of fiber without the water it can't do it's job as well.
Think of it as Liquid Plummer for your arteries.

hope this helps some. You don't have to starve. You just have to be willing to do some work with your existing diet.

kim
Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work --- Thomas Edison

What doesn't kill us makes us stronger---Friedrich Nietzche
 
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friendly_person3 replied to totallywiggedout's response:
THANK YOU, Kim! You have answered so many questions
that I've been saving to ask my doctor in June.

I had read about the importance of fiber, nuts & oatmeal and the only meat I've been eating is baked chicken breast. I've always been a hearty eater and I miss foods like pizza, hamburgers & all kinds of cheese! I'm 5'3" and weigh 115 lbs.
I'll be 70 years old June 18!!!

I do a 30 min. walk every day......sometimes twice a day!

Happy Mother's Day!
 
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totallywiggedout replied to friendly_person3's response:
My, My, 70 years young and you are learning how to eat again, lol.
Isn't aging fun??
I'm 48 and had amazingly high blood pressure in January 2012. With a change in diet to heart healthy foods, by May I was off my bp meds and now have normal bp.

As for pizza. Don't go without. Skip the white dough, buy some whole wheat english muffins and top with your regular pizza stuff , using canadian bacon, or chicken for your meat if you want some, and veggies with low fat or skim mozzerella. Drizzle with some Extra Virgin Olive Oil and bake at 400 for 8 min or so.

With Hamburgers, buy the 85% lean, take a ball of burger between the size of a golf ball and a tennis ball (Raquet ball sized) . Either grill or fry in a nonstick pan with cooking spray.
OMIT THE BUN, and use a romaine lettuce leaf, pile on the condiments, but leave the FULL FAT may off. Use only light mayo or none at all.

Cheese is a bit trickier. Just find the lowest fat choices of the ones you like. Fat Free Cottage cheese is great, btw, and so are those Laughing Cow Light wedges of spreadable cheese.

Thanks for the Mothers day wish. Hope you had a good one too. And if I don't catch you before... HAPPY BIRTHDAY!
huggs
kim
Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work --- Thomas Edison

What doesn't kill us makes us stronger---Friedrich Nietzche
 
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friendly_person3 replied to totallywiggedout's response:
I only wish I had learned to eat right back when I was young and I probably wouldn't have this problem. Never the less, what's done is done and I can't wait to get to Food Lion today to buy my ingredients for HOMEMADE pizza & hamburgers!

My daughter gave me a pedometer for Mother's Day & I walked off over 200 calories yesterday! If you conquered your bp problem, I know I can do this.....just needed some planning & encouragement!

Thanks again!
 
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abnersmom replied to friendly_person3's response:
Hi Friendly, Kim gave you some good advice. I had borderline high LDL and changed some things in my diet. My doctor was pessimistic about me being able to lower it through diet, but let me try before prescribing meds. Guess what? I did it. I now eat oatmeal with blueberries, walnuts and fat free milk 5 days a week for breakfast. I've reduced the amount of cheese I eat (love it and just wouldn't give it up completely). I've also gone meatless one day a week and have chicken as my protein most nights for dinner. I do still have red meat once a week. I avoid most processed foods, white carbs and have added more veggies. I have at least one serving of a dark green veggie daily - most days more than one serving as I love broccoli. Hope this helps.
 
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friendly_person3 replied to abnersmom's response:
Thanks for your reply & suggestions abnersmom! I also eat oatmeal at least 5 days a week and have found some mozzerella low-moisture, part-skim string cheese w/5 mg cholesterol! (there IS a God!) Apples, tangelos & bananas are my new snacks (instead of chips & cheese dip!) Lots of fresh, frozen and canned vegetables! I rarely eat red meat....chicken is the meat of choice in this house and since I'm a widow there's no one to argue! After I started the medication, I went to Hardee's and ate a THICK BURGER!!!! I now have a recipe for a low-cholesterol hamburger and have 6 little English Muffin pizzas in the freezer that I made myself!

Thanks to brunosbud, totallywiggedout & abnersmom - I know I'm on the right track!


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