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Roasted Radishes anyone?
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totallywiggedout posted:
While at the library the other day I happened to pick up an Epicureous mag. Found an article about how great radishes are sliced thinly and layered atop of buttered bread with a little salt... what got me was when the writer described "swirling" a radish in butter and giving it a sprinkle of salt then eating that first bite.... I have never liked radishes, you know? But also having been wondering about roasted radishes, I picked up a bunch. Hey, at 88 cents even if it sucked it was cheaper than the candy bar I used to get. Right?
Ok, so I admit that I "swirled" and salted my first radish. Not bad. The butter did indeed smooth out the peppery taste. So , onward.
Oven to 425, rinsed and trimmed my radishes, then dried with a paper towel.
Toss in a ziplock with a tad bit of olive oil to coat.
Roast on raised edge cookie sheet, or a cake pan or whatever
5-6 min , then shake to roll around , then another 6 min or so, depending on the size of your radishes.
Mine came out looking just like roasted little "new" red potatoes.
We tried them with lite salt. Good
We tried them with cajun seasoning, not so good
We tried them with garlic powder and lite salt.... HEAVEN
They taste a bit like potatoes, but if a bit underdone, they taste more like cauliflower.
Either way. A REALLY good alternative to potatoes since they only have 4 g of carbs to every cup of sliced (about 10 radishes) VS the 68 g of carbs in a 3" potato AND they cook up so fast that I can see this is gonna be the beginning of a long and fruitful relationship.
huggs
k
Kim SW 252 CW 180.3 GW 135

If hunger is not the problem, then eating is not the solution.---author anonymous

If you are going through Hell,keep going.-- Winston Churchill








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rachael2011 responded:
Read this post and decided it was time to start actually attempting to cook beyond the very, very basics. Checked out the recipes on here (you are a serious cook!) and on allrecipes.com. I found a white bean soup w lots of veggies. It also used sausage. Can you think of anything that would give it that flavor without all the fat of sausage? Even turkey sausage is high in fat, I thought. Or just skip the meat? Have been seriously craving bean soup.
Rachael...under construction.

SW 325 CW 318 Short term goal-299 Goal weight- Unsure
 
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totallywiggedout replied to rachael2011's response:
Hi Rachael,
Since I USED to use ham hocks or a big ole leftover ham bone for my bean soup I still crave that "smoked" flavor. If you aren't also watching your sodium too badly, try looking for a smoked turkey leg or two. There is also canadian bacon that is way way less in fat but still sort tastes like ham.
Otherwise, you could use plain ground turkey or have the butcher grind you a breast without the skin, then flavor it with garlic, pepper, a little cayenne, and lots of sage to make it taste like breakfast sausage, then fry it up a bit then put it in your soup, or turkey bacon which is nice too.
If turkey is too expensive in your area, substitute ground chicken breasts and make it sort of a "white bean chili" with cajun or mexican spices.
Possibilities are endless, lol
huggs
k
Kim SW 252 CW 180.3 GW 135

If hunger is not the problem, then eating is not the solution.---author anonymous

If you are going through Hell,keep going.-- Winston Churchill








 
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jis4judy replied to totallywiggedout's response:
Hey KIm I used to use a ham bone when I made beet soup I think my Hubbys family called it Borche
Hugs Judy:)
SW 247 CW 150ish maintaining

Remember the Gold is not in the prize it's in the Journey
life may not be the Party we expected but while we are here we may as well dance

 
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totallywiggedout replied to jis4judy's response:
Yep, Hungarian... did you swirl in the sour cream when you served?
huggs
kim
Kim SW 252 CW 180.3 GW 135

If hunger is not the problem, then eating is not the solution.---author anonymous

If you are going through Hell,keep going.-- Winston Churchill








 
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jis4judy replied to totallywiggedout's response:
Oh yes there was sour cream in the beet soup but since I am off of processed meats Ham isn;t on my plan anymore otherwise that was a pretty healthy soup// he is from a Polish background and a little Russian
Hugs Judy:)
SW 247 CW 150ish maintaining

Remember the Gold is not in the prize it's in the Journey
life may not be the Party we expected but while we are here we may as well dance

 
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totallywiggedout replied to jis4judy's response:
Ask him if he also ate Sour Soup and Charnina. the sour soup is great, but I wouldn't touch charnina with a 10 foot pole, lol. But I hear it's good.
huggs
k
Kim SW 252 CW 180.3 GW 135

If hunger is not the problem, then eating is not the solution.---author anonymous

If you are going through Hell,keep going.-- Winston Churchill








 
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jis4judy replied to totallywiggedout's response:
Hi Kim I just asked him he said no never heard of it just beet soup
Hugs Judy:)
SW 247 CW 150ish maintaining

Remember the Gold is not in the prize it's in the Journey
life may not be the Party we expected but while we are here we may as well dance

 
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totallywiggedout replied to jis4judy's response:
Judy,
both soups are "old" Polski, lol My ex husband's great grandparents came over on the boat and brought their versions with them.
Sour soup is made from ham bone, homemade egg noodles, raisins , sugar and vinegar... super good but it takes two days to make it right.
Charnina is also known a "duck blood" soup. Only the very old Polacks in Bronson, MI make it now mainly because it's got to be made from fresh blood and not many people raise ducks like they used to. blech
huggs
k
Kim SW 252 CW 180.3 GW 135

If hunger is not the problem, then eating is not the solution.---author anonymous

If you are going through Hell,keep going.-- Winston Churchill








 
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rohvannyn replied to totallywiggedout's response:
Gotta try roasted radishes. Maybe sometime when I am roasting something else at the same time, I don't like to turn on the oven unless I need to. I wonder if they would be decent microwaved?

I like to roast garlic in the microwave. Just take a head of it and microwave for a minute or less, it steams the garlic in it's own wrapper and makes it really mild tasting. I do it that way because I just eat it like that. You could probably do the same with peeled garlic.

Ah! My fond memories of Russian Borschch, also known as Borscht. I'm probably not Russian by ancestry but I went through a period of fascination with the culture. I made it chunky style with carrots and potatoes and onions and lean beef and beets of course, with plenty of dill to cut the "dirt" taste.

A fun Russian dish if you don't mind a little salt is as follows: take slices of black bread, butter thinly (you really don't need much) and top with a heap of chopped onions mixed with dill weed and salt. You can use those little black rye or pumpernickel loaves, or make your own rye bread. Good stuff, and unexpectedly tasty flavor. The bit of salt and dill really tones down the onion. I wonder how it would be, with a thin layer of hummus instead of the butter? I still don't eat much bread at all but I may have to try that.
Roh

'Your focus determines your reality.' -QGJ

'Try not. Only do.' --Y
 
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jean4u replied to rachael2011's response:
I made bean soup recently with ground turkey, leftover grilled chicken breasts. I added a mountain of veggies, included barley. I started with a small crockpot. Had to dump into large crockpot because I kept adding veggies from the freezer, even some that were a bit freezer burned came to life.

I re-froze this soup in 2 cup portions.

BTW, the beans I used were white navy and some chili beans. I added tumeric and a bit of cumin and the no salt seasoning.

Barb
 
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jean4u replied to totallywiggedout's response:
Kim, I'm a Pollak and we used to eat kieshka (as in "Who Stole The Kieshka song LOL) for breakfast. It's blood sausage. My Mom's fav was "head cheese" (you get the idea). She was raised on that Charnina, too, sort of a delicacy. When you had a farm NOTHING got waisted. Chicken feet in the soup, even!

Barb
 
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jean4u replied to rohvannyn's response:
I never thought about the micro for roasted garlic, thanks for idea.

My Dad used to eat onion sandwiches. He lived to 101!

I keep a container of cleaned radishes in water to snack on along with the celery in water. Having these go-to veggies in water makes them extra crispy and appealing.

Barb
 
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jean4u replied to rohvannyn's response:
About the Borscht (beet soup), my Mom made it with pork (spare ribs). She added the sour cream one time and it curdled, maybe too hot.


Barb
 
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jis4judy replied to jis4judy's response:
the sour cream was optional garnish in the beet soup
I added lots of shredded cabbage to it along with carrots celery garlic the usual starter for soups the left overs from a boiled smoked shoulder dinner were the liquids.. Hugs Judy:)
SW 247 CW 150ish maintaining

Remember the Gold is not in the prize it's in the Journey
life may not be the Party we expected but while we are here we may as well dance



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