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IBS-D - Lettuce problem
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gbrenne posted:
Sorry for being graphic, but I am having explosive diarrhea within an hour of eating lettuce! I have had IBS-D for about 10 years, and recently went on a trip to a third world country, where I could not eat ANY fresh fruit or vegetables. While I was worried about my IBS, I found out that my diarrhea went away for 11 out of the 12 days and I was back to normal again. Now, back home, the diarrhea has started back up again. (And yes, I do know that it's lettuce causing the problems--I can see undigested bits in the stool.)

This seems so contrary to the advice about adding fiber that I just have to ask, does this make sense to anyone?
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earthtonegirl responded:
It does make sense, but not too many people know about it. The problem is doctors just say "eat more fiber", but there are two very different kinds. Insoluble fiber, aka "roughage", is the tough stuff - lettuce leaves, bran, skins, stringy stuff, etc. Soluble fiber is softer - the insides of potatoes or apples, white bread, etc - and dissolves in water to form a sort of gel. That "gel" can be great for both IBS-D and -C. Roughage, on the other hand, can irritate a delicate GI tract. Some people's systems just don't like the stuff one bit.

There's a website, HelpforIBS.com, that has a lot of info about that. One of the things they suggest, for example, is to eat your salad at the end of the meal, after you've given your system a good "cushion" of soluble fiber.
 
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TrudyGERD responded:
Just because you're seeing undigested bits of lettuce in your stools does NOT mean that it's the lettuce causing the problem. Before I figured out all my food intollerances and other issues, any tme I ate salad I'd be in the bathroom within about 15 minutes of finishing and there would be lettuce bits in my stools. It was the salad dressing causing it, not the lettuce. Lettuce is just difficult to digest so when the salad would zip through my GI tract that's what would come out whole. The only way to be sure that it's the lettuce is to eat just lettuce without anything else and see what happens. My guess is that it's something in the salad.

That being said, fiber is actually horrible for some people. For many, fiber is very beneficial. For others, it causes a great deal of pain.
 
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cordless_linky responded:
I went to an IBS class at the Mayo Clinic that was very helpful. I now take 1 immodium before every meal and my problem's are very minimal. If taking 1 is to much for you start out taking 1/2 and work up to what work's for you. Good Luck
 
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ibs_d responded:
There are so many mixed messages out there about using immodium, but if the Mayo Clinic is advising it- would you mind telling what they said about immodium at that class? I'd really appreciate it.
 
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CalGal37 responded:
Gbreene, I'm one of the individuals in whom greens and 'roughage' is a no-no. My system can't and won't handle it so I just stay away from certain foods. So certain forms of fiber for me are out.

Take a long, hard look at what you ate while you were away. You'd be surprised at the food groups you'll exclude when you're traveling. Looking at that may give you a clue as to what's happening with your body - in case there something of a food intolerance issue going on.
 
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2Stubby responded:
Right, CalGal. But you need to repeat what you told me: roughage (insoluable fibre) acts like a laxitive because it irritates the intestines causing them to move fecal matter along faster. Coffee, apples and oranges do the same for me. Imodium, Peptobismal and Kaopectate contain bismuth bisulfate which paralizes the intestines. This lets more water be absorbed.
 
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momofanibs responded:
Look at the website Earthtonegirl told you about ?helpforibs.com?. It?s really helped us understand what soluble fiber & insoluble fiber is. SAMPLE of info from the website: ?The "soluble" in soluble fiber means that it dissolves in water (though it is not digested). This allows it to absorb excess liquid in the colon, preventing diarrhea by forming a thick gel and adding a great deal of bulk as it passes intact through the gut. This gel (as opposed to a watery liquid) also keeps the GI muscles stretched gently around a full colon, giving those muscles something to easily "grip" during peristaltic contractions, thus preventing the rapid transit time and explosive bowel movements of diarrhea as well. By the same token, the full gel-filled colon (as opposed to a colon tightly clenched around dry, hard, impacted stools) provides the same "grip" during the muscle waves of constipation sufferers, allowing for an easier and faster transit time, and the passage of the thick wet gel also effectively relieves constipation by softening and pushing through impacted fecal matter.? The web gives examples of soluble & insoluble fiber. There is a lot of good information on this website. It may not all work for you but it gives you some choices. Hope it helps. Kathy
 
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bonnets responded:
Fiber does me in too, esp. oats, many vegetables, everything I shud eat to keep cholesterol and weight down, gives me loose to diarrheal stools.I'm so tired of hearing fiber for everyone, for me it's low to no fiber!
 
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ravensfeet responded:
I had a similar experience. This was most helpful, I'm trying to figure out what gets my gut in an uproar, and that connection just clicked! The one time I ate lettuce in Peru (at a very fine restaurant) it affected me, and this being near the end of my trip with no prior problems! hmmmm.
I've never had problems with my gut in the past and at 60 it's hard to figure why. Just had a child come into my shop diagnosed with IBS. His mother said the symptoms started after a 2 day intestinal bug. I'm using a number of herbs to see if I can make some headway. Meanwhile, the lettuce is off the menu.
 
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julesdv responded:
What about msg? It is often used on lettuce to keep it from wilting, and and sprayed on it in the field as a fertilizer.


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