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Borderline epileptic or dehydrated?
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An_200687 posted:
I had my first seizure in June 2006 when I was 19 years old. I had a job servicing refrigeration systems and one day while walking to a work site I had a seizure. I was sent to the hospital and the EEG test while awake, came up with nothing, but the sleep EEG concluded that I was borderline epileptic because I had above average activity in my brain while I sleep.
I like to lift weights and was taking a supplement called creatine at the time. I think creatine is a diuretic and caused me to become dehydrated so much that it caused the seizure because I would work an 8 hour day at a physically active job, then go lift weights for about 2 hours. In october I had another seizure while I was at the gym but had stopped taking creatine right after I had my first seizure. The last time I had a seizure was when I was intoxicated in 2008 and most likely dehydrated.

I really believe that being dehydated from sweating/over-training caused my seizures because it has been a long time since I have had one and that taking sodium and potassium supplements will help me a lot. Can anyone give their insight on this?
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nemo1234 responded:
My 16 year old son has had 4 seizures in the past 18 months. Diagnosed with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. The only two common triggers we see so far is they occur within 2 hours of waking up and in two cases he was dehydrated. The other 2 times we don't know because it was before he was diagnosed. I've looked a lot on the internet and seen that some people only have seizures when dehydrated. So I think it is definitely a cause.
 
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dancer86442 responded:
Hello,

There are Many Causes & Triggers for seizures/Epilepsy. Causes are not the same as Triggers. From what I have read Dehydration is/mite be a Trigger for some people. The Stress caused by work/exercise regimen can be a Trigger, too. Please use Our Resources to learn More or use your search Tabs for info.

Definitely, talk w/ your Neuro B4 adding any supplements to your regimen. Too much or too little can Trigger seizures, also.

Are you on any anti-seizure meds? Do you keep a Journal? (More info under tips :) ) Please keep us updated. Would like to know Your Drs opinion on this. :) And, When it comes to Epilepsy, Second opinions or more are recommended. :)

Love Candi
 
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dancer86442 replied to nemo1234's response:
Hello Nemo,

Thank You for your input. I hope you &/or your son are keeping a Journal. It will be a Very useful tool in the future for DRS & your child. More info under Tips. And as Many sites have said "To prevent confusion, keep in mind, causes & triggers are two very separate issues."

Glad you are doing your 'homework'. Be sure you educate your son, too. :)

Love Candi
 
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kaibrig replied to dancer86442's response:
thank you for your response! i appreciate it. I did not think of the differences of causes and triggers when i posted my question yesterday. that was a good point to make. i'm kind of leaning towards the fact that it may be a trigger. right now i'm on lamictal, the brand name and want to talk to a neurologist about changing to the generic because of health coverage issues.

when i go to the doctor i'm going to ask about dehydration as being a trigger and want to see about getting an EEG to check my brain activity. I've only had 1 seizure during sleep after a long, hot day working outside but sometimes when i'm asleep i can feel my body very, very slowly convulsing. I wake up and it goes away. thanks again for your response.


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