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    Seizure Alert Cat?
    avatar
    sbncmo posted:
    I may have mentioned this on one of my other posts. After my trip to the ER last week with a series of seizures, I mentioned to my husband that it seems like my cat stays away from me on certain days & it ends up that I have seizures on that day. Afterward, he is so extremely affectionate. It's as if he can't get close enough to express his love for me. I thought maybe I was imaging it, but my husband told me to start watching to see if there was indeed a pattern.

    Well, it turns out that this past Tuesday, he stayed away from me & Tuesday evening I had a major seizure. The next day, he was glued to me. Then yesterday, he stayed away again & last evening I had a couple of seizures. Today he's been glued to me again & I've been fine.

    I know there are many seizure alert dogs out there. I even read about a horse that could detect when it's young rider was going to have a seizure & would gently kneel down, then lay down just before the little girl had her seizure. So who's to say that a cat can't detect seizures as well? Of course this is the first week that we have been actively watching for a pattern, but if he is in fact alert to me having seizures later in the day & shows that by staying away from me, he may be the warning I need, since most of my seizures occur without warning. True, he can't do anything to help me, but it can help me to be alert & take precautions.

    So, aside from having a lovable companion, I may have a valueable treasure in his perceptions.

    Anyone else with a similar experience?

    Shelia
    Reply
     
    avatar
    dancer86442 responded:
    Hi Shelia,

    There have been posts from past members on this site & other sites about Cats. :) Yes, they seem to be able to detect oncoming seizures, too. :) I think Animals are amazing. Thanks for sharing about the horse, too. That is Very Touching Story. I love It! :)

    Definitely, pay attn to your cat's body language &/or peculiarities. You do indeed have a valuable Treasure, in your Cat. :)

    Love Candi
     
    avatar
    sbncmo replied to dancer86442's response:
    Hi Candi, I was replying to your other post & hadn't seen my discussion here yet. Maybe it popped up while I was writing to you.

    Yes, the horse story was very touching. Animals are indeed amazing. I'm certainly going to keep an eye on my cat. Always learning.:)

    Shelia
     
    avatar
    Blindbat40206 replied to sbncmo's response:
    I have a cat that is trained to alert me and get help for me. We are trying to pass hb 260 where my state kentucky stops being the only state that says only dogs can be service animals. so if you live in ky please call your rep and get them to pass it


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