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Stepdaughter with Seizures
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aggie_lady08 posted:
Hello all;not too sure of how explain the situation so I'll start from what I know ... My stepdaughter has a history of fibril seizures; she's 7 now and will be turning 8 in a month. She had her last fibril seizure a couple of months ago however Sunday, she had a seizure in her sleep without a fever ... The hospital did blood work and a CT scan and her tests came back normal so she was released after having an appointment made with a neurologist. Today, she says she had a bad dream, woke up and went into the room with her mother to go back to sleep and had another seizure. At the hospital after a CAT scan, she had two more seizures while the doctor was in the room. Her scans and the 1st EEG came back normal. She's supposed to be having an EEG overnight; i don't know much about this and would like to help with any information I find. I do know that this is the first time she's had seizures outside of having a fever ... Are there any suggestions or possible reasons this may be happening??? Any little bit of information helps ... Thanks!
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saxofone1 responded:
Hi aggie,

I don't have any info to share with you about febrile seizures because my epilepsy started shortly before I turned 14.

I would like to say that many eegs come back w/o signs of seizure activity. What the drs call a normal eeg. This is not uncommon. My initial eegs showed no signs of any seizure acitivity.

It can be hard for techs to catch an actual seizure while someone is hooked up. Seizures tend to appear when they want to, not at scheduled times.

Overnight eegs are quite common. Sounds like she is scheduled for what is called video eeg monitoring(veeg). She will be hooked up to an eeg and be on camera during her stay. This way the drs are able to monitor her brain activity during her awake and sleeping hours.

Should a seizure occur during this time, the docs will have visual evidence as to what her activites are during an episode. The eeg has a strong chance of picking up acual seizure activity. This will help the med team locate the origin(beginning spot) of the seizure. This might also help them find the reason for her seizures.

She'll be asked to stay in bed(or in camera range) so all her activity can be recorded. Bathroom breaks don't count. Just let them team know so that they can mark it.

It is a rather simple test. Check to see if any computers are allowed. Many times they aren't because it may cause interference with the monitors.

It is good that her doc witnessed one.

Happy Birthday to your daughter. I send her my best.

angie
 
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dancer86442 responded:
Hello Aggie,

There are Numerous Reasons Why? And it will take Time & Patience while the DRS Try to figure it out.

Here are some examples of Reasons: 1. Since she has a history of seizures, her brain has, basically, taught itself to seize. Maybe in other areas of her brain. Possibly the Whole brain. Other area's: Frontal, Left or Rite Temporal Lobe. 2. Catamenial Seizures: These are seizures caused by Hormone Fluctuations. Too Young? NO! It has been proven that seizure activity can actually start Hormone Activity Earlier than other girls. 3. Diet. Too Much Gluten or salt. Or a Lack of other vital nutrients. 4. Genetic. Even if you know of no one in the immediate family w/ History, there may be generations unaccounted for.

So, what can you do? Help her start a Journal! More Info under Tips. A Journal is a Powerful Tool for her & her DRS. Find Books. Listed on EFA.org, Amazon.com & epilepsytalk.com. Chek w/ your Local Library Research Librarian for Availability Listed are Books for All Ages! Do 'homework' about Epilepsy & all it's aspects! Including Treatments! Becuz, DRS will only mention DRUGS, in most cases. We have info on Ketogenic Diets in our Resources. Plus, Search epilepsytalk.com for even more Info. (No need to join to read the Articles Phylis has Researched & Written.) Another Great Article by Phylis : Safety Proofing your Home.

Good News! A 'Normal' Scan (MRI or CT Scan) is Good. That means there are no tumors, cysts, lesions Involved. EEG's are as Angie said. Time & Patience! Again! Resources has another site: Questions for DR. Please chek it out. IF her Neuro is unwilling to answer questions: Seek Another Neuro! It can't hurt to have more than 1 DR opinion, anyway!

Best Advice for Parents: Continue to treat your child as 'Normal'. Yes, there are Some restrictions. But, children need to know, They are still capable of doing Soo much More. And Please, Let her Know: She Ain't Alone! A Children's Epilepsy Camp Logo: It Takes Brains to Have Epilepsy.

Please keep us Posted. Know we Care! HUGS!

Love Candi
 
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dancer86442 replied to saxofone1's response:
Forgot to Add: WebMD, also, has a Comprehensive slide show of seizures, symptoms, tests, etc.
 
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Haylen_WebMD_Staff replied to dancer86442's response:
Welcome aggie!

Here's a link to the slideshow Candi mentioned:

Slideshow: A Visual Guide to Epilepsy

Haylen
 
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DolphinBaby1369 responded:
Aggie - Hang in there is a long journey to be on but there is light at the end of the tunnel . My fiance is epileptic and they are scheduling him for a video monitoring for a week because all other sleep deprived tests and such haven't showed anything significant yet . I think you should do the test and see what happens from there I hope they find the cause and can fix it soon
praying for your little girl


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