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bad grand mal
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daisywilla posted:
my son just had a 5 min. seizure and his bp is very low and pulse is fast. this is happening alot he is on keppra and zonegran any ideas as to why seizures are lasting longer?
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dancer86442 responded:
Hello Daisy,

Was his Episode non-stop? Or back to back? Off & on? Gran mal aka tonic-clonic? Or other Type? Has he had anymore since? Low BP can mimic some types of seizures. Myoclonic, aka Drop Seizures, for instance. Do you keep a Daily Journal? Please read what to note besides Seizures. Last page of Tips.

Now, that I have asked My questions, here's what May be Happening. I don't know how long he has been on his current meds. It's possible that due to a 'growth spurt', food allergies, or other possibilities, that his system is not metabolizing/absorbing the meds properly. Most meds metabolize in the Liver/kidneys. Suggestion: Have his blood/urine cheked ASAP.

2-3 min or less is 'norm' for most episodes. Mom, any seizure activity that is non-stop & lasts Longer should be brought into the ER. I know they can't do much for him, after the event, but, they could/need to run the tests to determine Med Levels in his system.

I don't mean to alarm you, but, has your DR ever discussed SUDEP (sudden unexpected death due to Epilepsy) w/ you?

How is your son doing today? How Old is he? Know I care! HUGS! for you & yours.

Love Candi


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