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    Tiger6mom posted:
    I'm very new to the epilepsy community. My husband has being dealing with this since he was 13, he's now 42. His seizures happen at night when his body is very relaxed. I know I need to find some way to deal with my own anxiety about the seizures, but every time they scare me. I wonder what's really happening to him. He told me that his seizures effect the part of the brain responsible for short term memory and that with every seizure it causes more brain damage. I love him so much I don't want him to hurt
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    dancer86442 responded:
    Hello Tiger,
    Welcome to our Community. You can clik on my pic or userID to learn more about me. Your husband has been dealing w/ seizures almost as long as I have. What's really happening. I guess the best way to explain is to ask you to imagine our brain as a thunderstorm. When lightning strikes it causes a seizure. Another way to explain is the neurons in our brain misfire causing a seizure. Sometimes this can cause very small lesions on our brain. Brain damage? Not if they are the 'normal' 2-3 min. seizures. Brain damage occurs when a person has seizures that are non-stop & last for over those minutes. These are known as Status Seizures. Me, my sister & my daughter have experienced no brain damage. It's true that our Epilepsy can affect our memories. But, so can the meds we are on. Is your Hubby on medication or any Epilepsy Treatment? Hurt? The majority of us do not feel anything during a seizure. It's the after affects that can hurt. Sore Muscles, chewed tongue, confusion, etc. The worst of the short term memory is usually after a seizure. Some people don't recall family/friends, etc. for min, hrs, days, even weeks.

    You are new to Epilepsy? So, the best way to overcome your fears is to start educating Yourself! You need to do this anyway, so you can be Hubby's best Advocate, as a Witness to his seizures. You already know Proper first aid for seizures, I hope. So, my next question is does Hubby keep a Daily Journal? Or does he just track his seizures? Info as to what to include in a Journal under Tips on the rite. Last Page. If Hubby isn't doing this, You Should! It can help you identify his triggers. Foods/bevs, tv, comp, stress are the #1 Triggers. These are Not the Cause of seizures. He has already explained the Cause to you. The portion of his brain that misfires.

    Keep asking Questions! We are here to Help you. In my Book, caretakers are just as important as the people who have seizures. Maybe more so, since you watch over us, protecting us.

    Hugs Love Candi
     
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    Tiger6mom replied to dancer86442's response:
    Thank you for the information, I've been trying to find information on epilepsy and haven't had very good success. I want to better understand what is happening and if I can do anything to help minimize the number of seizures he has and to help talk to the doctors. I know he doesn't have a journal right now, but I'll do one and see if he can be motivated to do one as well. Where can I find your book. I read a lot anyway, might as well read as much as I can on this. After talking with Jim he says that the first part of the seizure was a grand mall, then he said he may have been having smaller seizures and that's why it seemed to me that he was just taking a long time to come out of the first one. He was non responsive for about 5 minutes after his grandmal
     
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    saxofone1 replied to Tiger6mom's response:
    Hi Tiger,

    How are you doing today? Welcome to the group.

    I started having seizures 10 before I turned 14, 3/75.

    You will find that Candi always offers great advice/suggestions that are helpful and supportive. She seems to be always the first to respond to new members. She's wonderful!!!

    Right now, I have nothing additonal to add to Candi's suggestions. She has given you Epilepsy 101. Much has to be learned by living with or caring for the indi who has it. Learning how to be supportive of someone with ep can be an on-going internship because there is always something new to learn.

    You mentioned books. Amazon.com has plenty of books in regards to ep.

    Is there a local Epilepsy Foundation near you. They will have much reading material for you. Possibly a support group too. Check resources for the general website/phone. Think about calling them and asking them to put together an info packet for you.

    Think about reading my story after you have checked out Candi.

    You have made an important step in asking questions and joining this disc site. We are here for each other.

    Welcome to the group,
    angie
     
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    dancer86442 replied to Tiger6mom's response:
    Hello Again :0 I didn't mean to confuse you. 'In My Book' is just an Old Term. But, Angie is Rite! There are Lots of Books about Epilepsy. Depending on what you want to learn. The First Book ever recommended to me is still the most Popular. I Think. Treating Epilepsy Naturally! You can ask your Local Research Librarian about any Available Books, too. She can call other Counties, too.

    Clik on: See All: Resources: Epilepsy 101 is good But keep looking thru till you find the link faqs.org under Epilepsy faqs. Less confusing terms. To me, anyway. Yes, you can have multiple Types of seizures, one after the other. A Gran mal AKA Tonic Clonic is the most serious Type of Epilepsy. But, the Majority of us feel nothing B4, during & afterward. Our Recovery Mode/Time can Vary, also. This is another reason a Journal & or Seizure Tracker (epilepsy.com has one) are Important. To see if there IS a Pattern.

    Tiger, if you Love this Man, do not let his Seizures Rule Your Life. It's obvious he doesn't let it Rule His. We Are Still Normal & just in need of Help, at times. Someone who loves us Tries to Understand. It's not Easy, at first. So, take it One Day at a Time. And be Strong! What you Both need to work on is eliminating Any Stress. So, take a Deep Breath, when seizures occur & do what ya gotta do calmly, quietly. Remember, he can 'sense' your Stress, too. Which isn't good for him.

    I will ad this: As a care taker you Must avoid Burnout. So, Make/take time for Yourself, too! Hubby doesn't need a constant 'caretaker' does he? Think about it. If he does Then call 1 of his Friends or family to spend some time w/ him. If he don't Mind. Keep talking w/ him & w/ us. We are Listening. HUGS!

    Love Candi


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