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seizure pattern change and cervical spinal cord stimulator
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wonderinginsc posted:
I was diagnosed at 17 with complex partial seizures in the left temporal lobe. Now, at 41 after a serious automobile accident 5 yrs ago. I recently got a cervical spinal cord stimulator for occipital neuralgia and other pain associated from the accident and neck fusion one lead is on the left as is the neuralgia.
It's been about 3 months since the stimulator was implanted and my seizure pattern has changed they are more "shaky" and I can now speak to those around me during these. Also the frequency has definitely changed... from an average of 1 per yr to (1 in the O.R, 2 in recovery) and at least 7 since. I stressed my concerns over and over about this before the surgery. Before a seizure, one of my limbs begins to tremble (giving me time to lay down). The strangest seizure took place recently. I actually was sitting up on my bed through the whole seizure talking. Does anyone have any idea if the stimulator is causing these problems? I am on meds for the seizures.
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An_251515 responded:
Hi,

I hope you epilepsy getting better now. I wonder if you continue to use spinal cord stimulation to treat neuralgia, I am doing some research about using spinal cord stimulation to treat the epilepsy. I found some stimulation frequency will aggravate seizure, some will suppress seizure. so I am very interesting in your experience. If you found this message, please send me email, my email is jj@hst.aau.dk .
I may can give you some explain about your problem.


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