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Vessel on my Penis
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tnguy1 posted:
I am a rather healthy 50 year old and have a 2 inch long vessel that reside just under the skin of my penis that runs from the pubic bone toward the head. The vessel is 1/4 inch diameter and runs along the top of my penis, slightly to the left side and then goes into the penis halfway down the shaft. I know that it is not a blood vessel and it is very soft and pliable. I am starting to notice this more and more lately as has become slightly painful after intercourse. Should I see a doctor about this? If so what is this?
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counterso responded:
It is probably an inflamed lymph channel, and you will need to refrain from masturbation or intercourse until it goes away, which could be anywhere from a couple weeks to a couple months. The doctor, if they tell you anything, will probably recommend anti-inflammatory medication like Advil, which sometimes but not often helps a little bit. There are some other posts about sclerosing lymphangitis in this board with some other suggestions, if you search for that term.
 
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tnguy1 responded:
Is that a normal location for the lymph channel, on top, slightly to the left, from the pubic bone to half-way down the shaft, just under the skin? If the inflammation goes away, will the lymph channel still be there? As an update, it is no longer sore after several days of no sexual activity but the channel is still quite pronounced, very soft, and will rub against underwear causing a chafing type rash. I am thinking about ordering the penetrating cream mentions under other similar topics of this board. I have a regular annual checkup in a few months and plan to show the GP the swollen lymph channel.
 
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counterso responded:
Lymph channels network through your whole body, and are usually relatively near the blood vessels, but aren't exactly fixed in place. Since there is no pump that moves lymph fluid, they rely on the motion of your body to keep them clear, and it's not terribly difficult when they get irritated or inflamed for them to stay that way. They sort of float under the skin, and rubbing them will usually make them flare up. It may take many weeks or a couple months for it to completely clear on its own. The penetrating cream helps reduce inflammation and break up congestion that clogs the lymphatic system. Some board posters have reported improvements using it, but it has just a little menthol in it, so let it evaporate before tucking in your underwear or you may get a little hot. Your GP doesn't see many penis disorders, so he may never have seen a swollen lymph channel in a penis. He may however prescribe high-dose anti-inflammatory use for the discomfort, provided you are otherwise healthy enough.
 
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tnguy1 responded:
I saw my GP today and your are correct that he hasn't seen many swollen vessels on the penis. He called it a large vein and really didn't know how it could be treated. He checked for blockage and there were none. Since the swelling has gone down and it does not cause any pain, he suggest that I be sure to use lubrication during sexual intercourse to prevent further issues. I tried the penetrating cream and had to quit using it because it burned my skin. Since I workout 3 days a week, I also switched to tighter fit underwear to provide more support, which I think helped the most. My thoughts. :cool:
 
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counterso responded:
Of course the cream burns a little bit. It has a little bit of peppermint oil (also called menthol) in it to drive the anti-inflammatory herbs into the soft tissue. But if you don't use too much (don't slather it on), just enough to treat the area, and wait 15 minutes before putting your underwear on, it'll be much better and only feel cool, not sting. It only has 1/3 the amount of peppermint oil of other creams like icy-hot, which would really roast your wiener, so to speak. You CAN'T have sex (or masturbate) until it's fully healed, lube or not, because the stretching and straining that goes on with your penis skin will cause it to become inflamed and congested again. Underwear support isn't the issue. Immobility and keeping your penis from rubbing against things and rolling around is what keeps it from getting irritated and inflamed again.
 
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seand001 responded:
I have had the same issue. My question is Topricin Anti-Inflammatory cream the same or provide similar results to the Quick Penetrating Cream? I first experienced this about 9 months ago and went to see my GP. His recommendation was no sex or masturbation for a month. Which seemed to work. Recently after a long sexual encounter I noticed it appear again worse then it was the first time. I have been tested for every STD all negative. So, i'm sure the cause is sclerosing lymphangitis. I have also found the term penis lymphocele used on the web. I'm going to wait the 2 to 3 months this time. But, would like to know if Topricin cream is the same or better to the Quick Penetrating Cream. Topricin link at drugstore.com www.drugstore.com/products/prod.asp?pid=184206&catid=9320 Doctor, has there been any success draining the blocked lymph's with a syringe? I would of course have this done by a Urologist. Thanks
 
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counterso responded:
Topricin is a homeopathic remedy. The other cream is a Chinese herbal formula. Their intent is the same, however their method of action is completely different. One is not better than the other necessarily, they just act differently towards the same end. It's like asking whether Tylenol is better than Advil. Both relieve headaches, but which do you prefer? Lymph is not a pressurized system and not in a stationary position in the body. I expect that you would find it near impossible to provide relief with a syringe. It may not even be a balloon to drain, even though it's swollen. It could be inflamed soft tissue. One does not drain lymph nodes in your neck when you have a head cold with a syringe. The best activity to get the lymph system moving is a trampoline. If lymph is not moving naturally because there are no muscles to move it (like in your penis), then it's a challenge to improve its circulation manually. And that's why breaking up the congestion and reducing the inflammatory response is most helpful with either of these creams.
 
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seand001 responded:
Hi counterso, I tired the Quick Penetrating Cream one time. I used a small amount and it caused severe irritation and redness. I stopped using it after one application. Is this normal? or am I have a side effect. Can you recommend something to help the redness? Hydrocortisone or neosporin possibly? Thanks again for your help.
 
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counterso responded:
If you use too much, it's going to feel like a burn, because of the peppermint oil. And you don't want to cover up the area for 15-20 minutes while these volatile oils evaporate. You also shouldn't put it on broken skin if the area is raw. It's possible you might be allergic to one of the ingredients though, and I can't guess which. Neosporin won't do anything. Hydrocortisone may or may not do anything depending on exactly what the redness is from. A cool washcloth is probably more help for immediate irritation. The cream is intended to increase circulation and repair soft tissue damage, so it would not be a surprise to have some pinking or a little tingle along with the cooling vapor feeling. Check the ingredients (there's a reference table on the web site where you got it) and see if any of them are things you are allergic to. You can also take some ibuprofen if you want. There are other calming salves that can get rid of the immediate irritation, but won't help the lymph issue. If it really burns right now, make up some oatmeal with extra water, let it cool, and apply that like a paste and cover with a cool washcloth to draw down the irritation.
 
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tnguy1 responded:
seand001 I had that happen too. After first using it, I quit using the Quick Penetrating Cream to let the skin heal and then started using it regularly. I also made sure the content of the tube is well mixed and it doesn't seem to burn as much. I use very little cream and I do try to let it air out before dressing. countero. I have been using the cream for at least a month and the vessel is still quite large and long. There is no pain or soreness and I have refrained from sexual activity. Should I stay the course?
 
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counterso responded:
The cream (and others that might be similar) acts as a local anti-inflammatory that also works on healing soft tissue damage and breaking up congested tissues. So, it is likely that it is accelerating the healing process, although it still relies on your body to clear out the affected lymph channel. These kind of things happen in the lymphatic system because it has no pump (like your blood vessels have your heart). Sclerosing lymphangitis has a history of resolving itself as mysteriously as it appears. And it's very hard to predict whether it will take 1 month or 6 months to clear itself up when left alone. Giving it some support certainly sounds like a good idea, and we don't know what the situation would be like if it were just left alone to compare because you're either trying some treatment or not. The only thing we really do know is that irritating the area with friction will make the inflammation worse, which is why we treat it gently. The traditional medical recommendation is a high-dose anti-inflammatory regimen, like 3 ibuprofen 200mg every 8 hours for several weeks, although I wouldn't do that without a doctor's approval. The herbal or homeopathic anti-inflammatory support just seems safer and still in the same direction. Good luck.


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