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Looking for help in understanding depression in my 24-year-old daughter.
An_245158 posted:
My "child" is a bit older than what I'm seeing on this site but my child nonetheless. I have a beautiful 24-year-old daughter who has been diagnosed with MDD. She is under the care of a psychiatrist who is well respected and I'm very thankful for that. I do believe that at least part of her depression is reactive. She is not happy with some things in her personal life, name career choice and lack of a relationship. I feel that while she is able to recognize these things, she just does not seem to be able to get to a place where she is diligently working to achieve these things. She comes home from work, eats dinner, spends time on iphone/computer, takes a sleeping pill and goes to bed. I don't mean to get frustrated but as a mother I have tried very hard to talk to her and it seems like she is pulling further and further away from me and others in her life, namely her sister, etc. Any suggestions would be most appreciated.
lds4ever responded:
I have a 25 year old son that just took a nose dive in the last 6 months. Depression runs in our family and he has been on medication for the past 5 years. He has been very dependable up until this started happening. I find there is a fine line between trying to help them and in-abling.
oceansisters replied to lds4ever's response:
Interesting you should mention enabling. I know I have done that to a point with my daughter. As mothers we are always trying to fix things for our children but I'm slowly beginning to realize that we cannot fix everything. We too have a family history of depression and I do think that is part of it, however, I do think there is a reactive component. Also, interestingly, I'm wondering if she was over-medicated of late. She was on Wellbutrin, which her father took and did not respond to well at all, and then her doc ordered Abilify which I think really brought her down. She is almost two weeks now into treatment with Lexapro which I'm hoping is starting to make a difference.

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