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That's Nice---A LOT OF GOOD IT'S GOING TO DO FOR MOST OF US!
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Anon_10033 posted:
I just happened to click on a related article (found w/I this fibro community), entitled: Exercise, Talk Therapy by Phone May Help Relieve Fibromyalgia Pain Treatments May Be Cheaper Than Medication and I just groaned because who among us will have access to talk therapy by phone? Who knows anyone who has been trained to provide such support in person, let alone by phone? I almost wish such articles weren't even published. For what purpose? For me to seek relief where none exists? I find more help and hope on these community discussion boards than anywhere else, period. I just wish it wasn't such a pain to type, but everything is a trade-off.
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An_249441 responded:
I'd read that article awhile back, and your post prompted me to read it again. If you have insurance and a case manager or a 'nurse line' there that you can call, you might find they offer a phone talk therapy option.

My insurance company invited me to participate in a phone talk therapy "pain management" group that lasted for 6 sessions. They sent a workbook and phone number to call.

We went through the workbook with the leader. Some people spoke often, some didn't. There was homework and support calls between the participants. When it was over, some of the people really thought it was great, not so much for me. In fairness to the program, I'm an introvert and phone group meetings aren't a natural fit.

Anyway, other fibro friends of mine have also done this through their insurance. Maybe it's something the companies think will reduce their future costs or something.

I hope this gives you a bit of information
 
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annette030 responded:
Many therapists will do phone sessions. My old therapist offered one when I could not get into the office and called to cancel an apt.. She said she had a number of clients who got their therapy that way. My MD recommended her, she had a Master's degree and a license.

I am a believer in talk therapy as long as one has goals. I learned CBT and continue it on my own without a therapist. I also take meds from my doctor, belly dance daily, and use a hot tub daily. I really think FMS requires a variety of interventions. I have had FMS for about 18 years now, the only professional help at this time is seeing my primary care doctor four times a year for RXs. FMS is managable, it sucks but it won't kill you.

Please remember that no one really knows what causes FMS, and that community discussion boards include folks who will sympathize with you as they have similar problems. They will tell you what helps them cope. They are not educated necessarily, and are not required to have special training. I think using them for what they provide, and using professionals for what they provide is a good mix.

Take care, Annette
 
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Anon_10033 replied to An_249441's response:
I rather popped off in that post. In light of your thoughtful reply & annette030's, too, I realize my situation wavers from the norm because all of my care is through the VA, as I was enlisted in the Army back in the '70s. The VA has decidedly moved away from individual CBT and has gone exclusively for group therapy, different groups targeting different issues. I've adamantly refused group for several years, (& reasons) but finally reconsidered, only to find out that our schedules were not compatible (week day, time, & travel).

Frankly, I hate talking on the phone! So, I wouldn't particularly want to engage in phone talk therapy. However, on the rare occasion I've bumped into someone who also has fibromyalgia, the commonality and instant empathy is amazing and comforting. I guess that is what I really desire. And, I suppose that is why I credit these WebMD communities as a supportive resource, just as you two have been. Thank you.
 
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missist replied to Anon_10033's response:
I'm not sure I understand. Talk therapy? instead of medication for pain? that must be some humdinger gab fest.
 
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moxie1956 replied to missist's response:
LOL! Fibro demands several diverse strands of management, talk therapy being one those strands. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) has proven to be effective, but is almost always used in conjunction with other treatments, such as pain meds, massage, warm water therapy, biofeedback, etc.

When I first responded, I was not in good form, and I hastily rebuffed the notion. As I mentioned above, I hate talking on the phone, so it would not be a good mode of treatment for me.

Checking in with this community has been helpful, but I especially appreciate meeting someone one-on-one with whom there is an immediate understanding of what we each go through on a daily basis. Not even my family members can fully understand, although they acknowledge and accept and help out as they can.
Featherlight Hugs,
Moxie
 
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An_249441 replied to missist's response:
Hi Mary and Moxie,

It's not instead of meds, it's another tool added to our kit.

I wasn't lucky enough to have CBT, it was more like communication skills for chronic pain patients. I was the only fibro person in the group, others were cancer survivors with damage from treatment, one with that pelvic cystitis, and so forth.

From what I've learned from this and other boards, CBT is on my list of topics to research.


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