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    Involuntary Head Turning
    avatar
    An_258054 posted:
    Hi all! I am new to this message board and want to ask a question that has flared up my neck big time.

    I was diagnosed with Myofascial Pain Syndrome and Fibromyalgia over 10 years ago...after working in a factory for many years, doing the same type of work, it finally took its toll and turned me into a pretzel.

    I was working on my computer about a year and a half ago and I noticed that my head was turning slightly to the right when I was typing. I remember this like it was yesterday because it has gotten worse as time has gone on and I finally flared up in my trapezius a couple weeks ago from literally trying to turn my head to the center position. There is a name for this and kids have it, but my rheumatologist just put it down as "chronic" and gave me tender point injections which didn't work and now I'm spending quite a bit of money in p/t with a great therapist who is literally using her elbow to try to release a trigger point....

    Has anyone experienced this type of head-turning where they literally had to turn their head to look straight ahead? I'm very interested in hearing if someone else has gone through this!!
    Reply
     
    avatar
    katmandulou responded:
    Hi An_ and welcome!

    I did a search and came up with Torticollis: spasms in the neck that cause neck pain and stiffness, tilted head and more. Here's a link to webmd:
    http://www.webmd.com/parenting/baby/torticollis-directory

    Lou
     
    avatar
    sufferinginconway replied to katmandulou's response:
    Yes...you are right and I brought this up to my rheumatologist who is treating this as fibromyalgia or myofascial pain. My therapist said if it was truly Torticollis, my head would literally be stuck to one side, which it isn't. I've had therapy on my neck many times, but it never started the way it started this time....I'm just praying it doesn't take forever to fix!!

    Thanks, Lou
     
    avatar
    franr responded:
    Hi An
    Welcome to our fibro group.Over the years working in Pedi I have had many patients with torticollis.Sometimes babies are born with this .It is also called wrye neck.I never have seen any adults with this syndrome.If you can please make a app with a neurologist and see if they can come up with aproper diagnosis.Please be careful with PT it can exacerbate the problem more. I this a true wrye neck syndrome there are certain exercise to relieve the muscles but don't let anyone continue to stretch those muscle.Good Luck. Fran....
     
    avatar
    sufferinginconway replied to franr's response:
    Thanks so much for your help and input on this! I will definitely go on to another dr. if I don't show some improvement soon....


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