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Weight loss -young adult
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ryowens posted:
I am a 23 year old male and have been a big guy my whole life. Medically I am considered obese but I have never felt that way. I am just under 5'10'' and currently weigh 235lbs. I have worked out in college and was able to maintain around 218. Now in the work force I have gained a lot and although this is not the biggest I have ever been i feel bigger than ever before. I looked at myself in the mirror this morning when a fitted dress shirt no longer fit me and my 38'' jeans were cutting me off and I realized something major needed to be done. So I turn to you, my WedMD community to help me out with advice. I have always wanted to start running again and finish a 5k maybe one day a half-marathon as well as start back on my weight training. For the most part I know what needs to be done for the exercise, it is the dieting that is difficult. I have already done one of the hardest things when it comes to dieting, given up sodas. I have been drinking water with 80% of all my meals for the past 3 years now as well as stopped drinking caffeine completely. This is what I think the only reason I was able to hold off massive weight gain in the past but now working in a cubicle half the time and traveling the other half I am starting to see me get out of hand. I really not sure what I am asking, I need to find a plan... Should I just count calories? should I mix my running training with my weight gain training? A general pace at which I should work out. How to eat better when I have to eat out on the job. Ideas for frequent, smaller meals eating in the office. should i just do those p90x or xtreme shows? My goal is be under 200 in 6months, i hope this is doable. Thanks in advance.
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pallzy responded:
The one question I can answer for you. Eating at restaurants. I always look for a meat that is either baked, broiled or grilled. No fried or battered. I try to make sure my sides come with steamed vegetables and I avoid potatoes or pasta sides. Keep in mind most restaurants serve you enough for two meals. Some suggest getting a to-go box at the beginning of your meal and putting half of it away before you start to eat. I personally don't do that one, but it makes sense.
5'11 SW 275/GW 160/CW 164
 
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Rich Weil, MEd, CDE responded:
I suggest that for the next week you write down every single morsel of food you eat, and every ounce of beverage with calories you drink. And I mean every single thing you put in your mouth. Weigh and measure everything. Buy a food scale and measuring cups if you don't have them. Estimate portion sizes when you eat out using something like a deck of cards or a measuring cup to compare objectively with. During this time go to the following site to figure out how many calories you are consuming:

www.webmd.com/diet/healthtool-food-calorie-counter

Then go to http://www.webmd.com/diet/healthtool-metabolism-calculator to determine your calorie needs, and for general nutrition and diet questions click here

http://exchanges.webmd.com/diet-exchange


Check out the following sites for training programs:

www.coolrunning.com/index.shtml

www.halhigdon.com

www.jeffgalloway.com/

www.runnersworld.com/home/ (Click on "training plans" in the left margin)


The cool running site has "The Couch-to-5K Running Plan" which is a great way to get started.

Take care,

Rich


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