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Fatigue (work-out)
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JmTP3 posted:
Hi,


I work out extremely hard, I do high intensity interval training (track sprints, plyo, and hill sprints), and lift weights. I am also very active in my yard, (weed whacking, push mowing, pulling weeds, mulching). I have a job where I am physically active throughout the day.

About 45 days ago I started doing P90X (I can keep up with Tony Horton), plus my usually lifting weights, and cardio. I knew I was overtraining, but I like the endorphin kick, and I thought I could handle it being that I use to be a college athlete, and that I have worked out hard for years. However, with the P90X I defiantly up my work out load even more.

About 2 weeks ago I started feeling fatigued (45 days into P90X+ my usual work outs), but I thought nothing of it, I just kept pushing through it, then after my "off day" (a hard mile, ten 100 meter sprints, and some tennis) my muscle felt shaky, or jittery, I thought maybe I have not ate enough. But Since then I have had total muscle fatigue, which leads to anxiety. I have had blood work done, and it came out fine. I have even taken 10 days off working out. I feel somewhat better, but not neat what I should feel.

I guess my question is, can you totally fatigue your muscle, and if so how long does it take to recover, or till I will start feeling like myself again? PLEASE HELP!

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Rich Weil, MEd, CDE responded:
Hi Jm,

It sounds like you did a real number on your body. You sound completely depleted. No one can tell you with certainty how long it will take to fully recover, but it sounds like 10 days almost did it. You may need 2-3 weeks. That's not so bad considering how hard you pushed. I suggest you take the break from the intense workouts until you start to feel stronger, and then build up slowly. Maybe P90X 2 or 3 days a week with 2-3 days in between each workout. I also suggest you start eating very healthy to help your body recover. You can post your diet-related questions to the Diet Community:
http://exchanges.webmd.com/diet-exchange

Good luck. Rich
 
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JmTP3 replied to Rich Weil, MEd, CDE's response:
Hi,

Thank-you so much for taking the time to write back, I greatly appreciate it.

Have you ever heard of overtraining syndrome, and if so what do you know about it? I have been trying to do some research on this topic, and I have come to realize that it is a fairly new term, but a very real syndrome.

Again, if you could take the time to talk to me about it I would greatly appreciate it. Thanks a lot, J



Jm
 
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Rich Weil, MEd, CDE replied to JmTP3's response:
Hi Jm,

Overtraining is a very well-known and long-established condition. Symptoms of overtraining are loss of strength, speed, endurance, or other elements of performance, loss of appetite, inability to sleep well, chronic aches and pains or soreness, chronic colds or respiratory infections, overuse injuries like tendinitis, unusual fatigue, occasional increase in resting heart rate, irritability, or you just don't feel like exercising anymore.

I would have put these to you with my original response but I guess it seeemd so obvious, and so urgent, that I didn't. But yes, you are right, you are overtrained. Generally it takes 7-10 days, but in your case, you had pushed so hard, and you already had rested 10 days it wasn't totally effective. That's why I suggested 2-3 weeks and then starting back more conservatively. You can start with light cardio and some light resistance exercise and pace yourself. You should show up at your workouts feeling refreshed and ready to go, not worn out. Overtraining is certainly not a permanent condition, and with enough rest and proper nutrition, your body will heal and you'll be good to go again.

I hope that helps. keep me posted. Rich
 
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JmTP3 replied to Rich Weil, MEd, CDE's response:
Thanks again, I will keep you posted. You're Awesome!

Jm
 
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Rich Weil, MEd, CDE replied to JmTP3's response:
You're very welcome.
 
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JmTP3 replied to Rich Weil, MEd, CDE's response:
Hi,

I thought I would give you an update. I have definitely found out that overtraining syndrome is NO JOKE! It is very difficult to recover from, and it is hard to get the average exerciser to know how you feel. I basically had to take 3 week completely off. In week 3 I did walking, riding air bike 5-10 minutes, and light abs. This week I did some abs, air bike, ran a light mile, did elliptical, and some very light weights). I felt decent after doing them. Today I did 40 minutes on elliptical at a lower intensity (I felt it). The hardest part for someone like me is to stop, I always want to keep pushing and do 5 more minutes, or a few more sets. I miss my hard workouts but I know I am NOT ready for them.
So is it normal to still feel a little week after working out? I know this is going to take some time, and I hope I am on the right track, but it is hard to not get frustrated. I started doing a protein shake to try and help. So if you have any more advice for me I would greatly appreciate it. Thanks a lot, J
 
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Rich Weil, MEd, CDE replied to JmTP3's response:
Hi JmTP,

Thanks for the update. You ought to check the Diet Community:
http://exchanges.webmd.com/diet-exchange They can help you assess your diet to make sure you are getting enough calories and nutrients. Three weeks should be enough to recover from overtraining, particularly if you were getting lots of rest and your diet was proper, but if the weakness continues then I suggest you speak with your doctor. He or she might want to do a complete physical. It can take time to recover, and you should resist the urge to work out hard and push it, but like I said, three weeks should be enough for recovery. If you have the time, let me know how it goes.

Take care,
Rich


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