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Aching legs
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Richkrz posted:
Hi Rich,
I'm only able to exercise in the morning before work, but I'm having problems with my legs. They are very heavy feeling and sore every morning, and even after doing a light warmup it doesn't improve. When I try pushing through my working (either cardio or circuit training w/ weights, never more than 30 minutes of workout time, not counting warmups and cooldowns, so I dont' think I'm overtraining), it does not improve. I have sleep apnea and wake up tired in general, so am not sure yet if the two are related. I've also tried hatha yoga in the morning and it didn't help.

While I sort that out though, do you have any ideas about how I could adjust my workouts to get some benefit from them? Can you suggest what types of exercise might be best right now? (I'm 40 years old, 6'3", 190lbs. So I'm not overweight, and would actually like to add upper body muscle, tone legs, and improve aerobic endurance).

Thanks!
Rich
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Rich Weil, MEd, CDE responded:
Hi Rich,

Why don't you do just upper body exercises until you find out what's going on with your legs (which you ought to see your doctor about). Check out exercise tubing for resistance exercise if you don't already have them. Tubing is inexpensive and versatile (you can do lots of exercises with them even in a chair) and a great way to get started with resistance exercise. You can start with a set of three for about $20. They come in colors to denote the tension. If you order them make sure to order the strap that allows you to attach the tube to a door (this is essential for many exercises), and if you want to work your legs, ask for leg straps. Here are some vendors that sell them.
www.performbetter.com/catalog/default.asp
www.power-systems.com
Here's a site with great videos http://www.body-mind-strength.com/resistance_tube_exercises/resistance_tube_exercises.html

And what about suspension system straps? You can use these indoors or out by hooking them over a door or tree or monkey bars. Check out the Jungle Gym device http://www.strapsworkout.com/ or the TRX suspension system http://www.trxtraining.com/ (much more expensive). Both devices will allow you to do many upper body exercises, and one advantage is that you use your body weight and you can adjust the resistance by changing the angle of your body. They work many muscle groups because you must stabilize yourself. For instance, if you do a row, you must lean back and pull in, and that means your torsos and abs must work in addition to your back and posterior shoulder. must use flyes, wide-grip and deep presses for your pecs, and many exercises for your arms, back, shoulders, and abs as well. Both are great workouts.

What do you think? And if you feel like it keep me posted about your legs. I'm interested to know what's going on.

Take care, Rich
 
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Richkrz replied to Rich Weil, MEd, CDE's response:
Thanks Rich, I'll definately keep you posted on what I find out. In the meantime I'll stick with upper body exercises and just do what I can for cardio ( I have a nordic track) to exercise my legs. I do have a TRX and like to use it mainly for arm and back exercises and 1-leg squats.
 
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Rich Weil, MEd, CDE replied to Richkrz's response:
You're welcome. Of course, be careful with TRX for your legs.

Take care,
Rich
 
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Richkrz replied to Rich Weil, MEd, CDE's response:
Hi Rich,

I had a sleep study done, and they confirmed that it is not Restless Legs. So something else is going. I would attribute it at least partly to stress. But my neurologist did say that I had a mildly pinched nerve in my leg. I actually think I aggravated the pinched nerve this weekend because my left lower leg feels very heavy and is tingling. I am also completely unable to flex the left up (cotracting the shin muscle) so even walking is painful. So it sounds like rest, ice, and ibuprofen until things improve, which means no exercise I can't even do upper body weights because I can't lift heavy dumbbells from the floor or support my body on my toes for pushups
 
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Rich Weil, MEd, CDE replied to Richkrz's response:
I'm sorry to hear it. Maybe at some point the doctor will permit you to do physical therapy. I hope you feel better soon. Rich
 
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Richkrz replied to Rich Weil, MEd, CDE's response:
Thanks Rich,

Still no improvement. My neurologist had MRI's of my lower lumbar region and my brain (to rule out MS), but they didn't find anything. So he basically said to just wait it out and let it heal on it's own. But it's going on a year now since symptons first started. My suspicion from doing some reading is that the pinched nerve may originate in the hip area, but I'm not sure why he didn't have an MRI done in that area.

I'm still struggling with morning exercise (the only time I can commit to it). My body is just too sluggish (tired, dull headache, heavy stiff legs) to do anything remotely vigorous even if I make sure to do warm up. I'm more tired after exercise than before which means I'm doing something wrong. I'm just not sure how to adjust my routine so that it is vigorous enough, but something I can do in the morning at home.
 
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Rich Weil, MEd, CDE replied to Richkrz's response:
Maybe you should discuss with your pcp seeing a physiatrist. They may see things that the neurologist does not. Just a thought. I wish I could help more. I hope you find the answer. Rich
 
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Richkrz replied to Rich Weil, MEd, CDE's response:
Hi Rich,
I've gone back to my primary care physician, and he is now thinking it might be achilles tendonitis. So he was given me a prescription antiinflammatory, and said I should lay off of any exercise of my legs (both cardio and strength training) and even limit my walking.

I rely on exercise to help with my stress management. I can continue to work my upper body, but do you have any ideas of how I can structure a routine for 5-6 days a week with this restriction? (I am hoping I can continue to at least walk as long as it doesn't cause any pain). Can you think of any leg exercises I could do that would minimally involve the calves?

Thanks,

Rich
 
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Rich Weil, MEd, CDE replied to Richkrz's response:
Hi Rich,

You could do circuit training without leg exercises. It involves a small amount of walking from station to station, but it is minimal. Circuit training (CT) is where you spend 45 seconds at each weight training station, including machines, dumbbells, and ab work, and do reps for 45 seconds, then 15 seconds to the next station. You can do it for 25-30 minutes, although I suggest 10-15 minutes to start and build up since it's hard and you want to make sure you don't overtrain. CT will give you strength training as well as cardio since you should get your heart rate elevated because of the constant movement. It's a great workout. As for leg exercises, you could do seated leg extension and leg curl, and seated hip ab/adduction since none of them are weight-bearing and they do not involve flexion or extension of your ankle, or contraction of the calves, under an external load.

I hope this helps. Let me know how it works. Take care, Rich
 
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Laricsports replied to Rich Weil, MEd, CDE's response:
skipping rope is best exercise but there many ropes on internet and quit difficult to make right choice, here is link to know types of skipping ropes . http://laric-sports.com/en/


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