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Coughing up phlegm after exercise
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reechani posted:
I have just started an exercise program at my local gym. I use an elliptical or stair-step machine for 30 minutes, and then I swim very low-paced laps for 30 minutes. Once I get breathing hard, I start coughing up phlegm that seems to come back as soon as I get rid of it. It lasts several hours after I'm done exercising, and this has happened for as long as I can remember. I don't smoke, I don't have allergies, and I tested negative for asthma(and this is a wet cough anyway). I have had both pneumonia and bronchitis before, and the cough is very similar to those. It does go away after a while, but is very irritating. Can anyone give me some advice?
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Rich Weil, MEd, CDE responded:
Excess mucus production during exercise is usually associated with asthma, respiratory infections, and bronchitis, from irritating the airway. But it can also be from vigorous exercise where you breathe faster through your mouth, which means dust and other debris is not filtered through the nose, so it builds up in the throat, and then you must expel it. I don't know what's causing yours. You might want to have another visit to the pulmonologist. They have all sorts of testing they can do, and even a pulmonary stress test since this happens during all sorts of exercise. if you feel like it post back and let me know what you find out. Take care. Rich
 
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brunosbud responded:
I vaguely recall I use to do that when I started on my road back from hell, reechani. I smoke & drank, heavily, and abused food for years; too many to remember. Trust that it will pass as your lungs, skin, liver and kidneys gain strength and form healthy new tissue. That's what happens when you start eating, green, and exercising, daily. Your body can repair, itself.


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