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Krzykrys posted:
I am 3 yr female who used to run in high school, started a walk/jog exercise self-training program a couple months ago. I feel so much better after going out for a 5-mile walk/jog, and the hardest thing is to find the time around work schedule (shifts change all the time, from very early to late shifts, and a lot of 6-day weeks). How do I know when I reach a place where I need to 'crank it up'? I'm thinkng it's taking a bit longer because I haven't maintained a consistency (just short walks for several days, then a long walk/jog for a day or 2, then back to almost nothing 'cause of the work thing).
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Rich Weil, MEd, CDE responded:
Hi Krzykrys,

You'll know if an when you feel like your performance is diminsihnig or just static. It will take longer thanw hen you were younger, and if traing is inconsistent then that will also affect the outcome. You can increase the intensity (running faster or intervals) if you can't do it more than 3-4 days a week, and thatw ill improve your endurance. The other thing to consider is that even just 2-3 miles will give you your "fix" and so it doesn't have to be 5 miles every time (sometims I go out just for a mile to get something in, and it feels good). 2-3 miles will cut your time considerably. It doesn't have to be all or nothing. Give that a try and see how it goes. It will definitely improve your fitness.

God luck with it.
Keep me posted. Rich


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