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No Weight Loss (diet + exercise)
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Freetrog posted:
Hello everyone, this is my first post, so please bear with me. For the past three months I have gone from what essentially amounts to a couch potato, to working out six times a week, and consciously watching my caloric intake. I'm 6'0 ft tall, 33 year old male, and weigh 255 lbs. That's pretty much the weight that I started out when I was just watching TV, and not exercising. According to my BMI calculator, I fall into the obese category @ 34.7, although I don't really think this is accurate, but a fact none the less. I have always been broad, and used to weight train heavily when I was younger. I also have a large frame (bones), according to what I've been told by physicians Facts about me: I work over nights (2am - 11am), and have moderate sleeping problems. Not sleep apnea, but insomnia coupled w/ frequent wake ups. I work out late in my "day" meaning around 2 PM, which is is 3 hours before my theoretical bedtime of 5PM. I often eat dinner after my workout, as it's the only time that is convenient for me to do so. (I know that this is a NONO, but no one's life is ideal right?) My workouts: Monday/Wednesday/Friday - Weight Training (various routines and muscle groups, I use rotations to avoid muscle tolerance) Tuesday/Thursday/Saturday (occasionally Sunday) 60 - 90 minutes of Cardiovascular exercise. Again, I vary the routines, but typically it involves walking/running, exercise bike, and elliptical machines. (I had a horrific knee injury about ten years ago, so the scope of what I can do is somewhat limited) My diet: According to my age and weight I should be able to eat 2820 calories a day and "maintain" my current body weight. I would say that in a typical day, I take in between 1800-2200 calories. I eat healthy (for the most part), and I cook with fresh ingredients. I avoid fried foods, and excessive carbohydrates. I eat a lot of fruits, nuts, and vegetables. I don't drink soda, but will have iced tea of coffee in the morning. I basically follow all the general rules of a healthy diet, as well as anyone can. Also, I don't drink any alcoholic beverages. My problem: For the past three months, I have started and maintained the above routine. In the beginning, my workouts were less consistent, and probably not as intense as they are today, but none the less it is something that I work at on a daily basis. However, I have not lost a single pound! For a few weeks I dropped down to 250 (maybe 248 counting water weight), but otherwise I haven't seen any significant changes in my weight. I am now back up to 255 and holding steady. So despite eating fewer calories than weight maintenance requires, and burning up to 700 calories through exercise, I have seen no change. I would say that I have gained a good deal of muscle, my arms and legs are bigger, my stomach is somewhat flatter (I think), and my chest and shoulders are broader. I still wear the same size pant that I did before and I still have a belly, it's just not as pronounced. I also had some blood work done about 6 months ago, and all my numbers came back fine. (Which in my mind eliminates possible thyroid issues) I'm essentially for some advice or insights that anyone might be able to offer me. Say I am trading muscle for fat, I should still be dropping weight right? Especially since I'm getting anywhere from -600 to -1000 calories per day. I'm looking forward to getting to know all of you, and thank you for reading my lengthy post. -Justin
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ryowens responded:
Hello. It seems to me that you are doing everything fine. Honestly you really might be trading muscle for fat, especially if you were extremly un active and a true coach potato before. I would have cardio before every weight lifting day and I would add in core excercises. Because of your late night working there might be a combination of sleep disruptions and food consumption. Eating something every 3-4hours(snacks/small meals) is the best way to improved your metabolism, which is what I think your problem might be, along with doing more core intense work-outs. But honestly if you feel better, more energized, stronger then you are good. Only thing that also might be is lack of intesity, you should make sure during your cardio work-outs you have a high heart rate and push yourself, even on the elliptical (Increse resistance or stride). I hope this helps but I am no expert! Byee.
 
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1stbaby2008 responded:
I am not sure if I can help or not, but I will let you know what I have experienced before. You sound like you are doing good. I would say you probably have traded some fat for muscle, but I would still think that you would have lost a few pounds. I use the Biggest Loser method and have had great results. They would have you taking in about 1785 calories and of course, doing a mixture of cardio and weights. Are you doing any interval training? I strongly reccomend it to burn more calories. I would really document your calories to be sure you are not sneeking any in and keep up with your calories burned. But then, I have overtrained before, where I was not eating enough to support my workouts, which caused me to stall. I always tell my friends losing weight is trial and error! you keep tweaking either your diet or work outs until you find what works. I lost 30 pounds in 6-7 weeks doing the Biggest Loser diet. I got pregnant and am now doing it again to get my baby weight off. So far I have lost 12 pounds in 3 weeks, so it is not too bad!
 
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SurokDonnpopooki responded:
I know your frustration I've taken simalar steps in terms of diet and exceris. I do about 90 to 60 mins of cardio for 4 days and weight lift my upper body at maxium possibility for muscle growth on the 5th day. I then take 2 days off to let my body recover. I'm 32 male and 230 lbs but I started at 237 two months ago. My body is experincing the same exact changes and results. I eat very healthly with lots of veggies and avoid emtpy calories. I feel and look healthier but seems no matter how hard I try the pounds don't want to come off. I don't think I'm putting that much muscle because it's not possible to put on that much muscle per week.
 
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R_Weil responded:
Hi Justin, To lose weight you must consume fewer calories than you burn no matter how much exercise you do. Even if you run a marathon every day you will not lose weight if you consume more calories than you burn. So if you?re not losing then you are consuming more calories than you burn, even if you think you?re not. In fact, research shows that people can under estimate their calorie intake by as much as 40% to 50%. As frustrating as this may be it?s true. The good news is that you have all the behaviors in place and so now it?s time to tweak it. I suggest keeping up with exercise like you?re doing (except you could cut back on cardio to 45 minutes), but now it?s time to focus on calorie intake. Start counting calories carefully and recording what you eat. Record and count everything you eat and drink, and be as accurate as possible. Use packaged foods if necessary for many of your meals so you know how many calories you?re consuming. Restaurants and even cooking at home can make it tough to estimate accurately. Go here www.webmd.com/diet/healthtool-metabolism-calculator to determine your calorie needs, keep up with exercise, and make the changes in your calorie intake for one week. You?ll lose weight if you do those things. Take care, Rich
 
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jstagirl responded:
Hi -- During my own weight loss quest, I've noticed that even on the days I work out and eat right, I'm thwarted if I don't drink enough water. And if I remember correctly, I read somewhere on this website that dehydration slows metabolism. As a result, the 2820 you quote as the "maintaneance" metabolic rate might really be higher than the actual "maintaneance" rate, due to low water intake. You don't mention how much water you take in, but I find it something I really have to remember and consciously track if I want my weight to continue to drop. Hope this helps...


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